Government and Politics

July 7, 2011, 9am PDT
A draft report from San Diego reveals that California's SB 375 law, which passed in 2008, was ineffective in reducing sprawl in the long term, Ethan Elkind writes for the UCLA UC Berkeley Legal Planet blog.
Legal Planet
March 4, 2011, 11am PST
No matter what alternatives it can think of, the Obama Administration remains baffled why most Americans are still attached to their cars, says Fred Barnes.
The Weekly Standard
February 27, 2011, 11am PST
As popularity of "temporary urbanism" initiatives rises, there are increasingly efforts to regulate these sites. Jonna McKone of TheCityFix analyzes the trend.
November 17, 2010, 12pm PST
Detroit reporter John Gallagher's new book "Reimagining Detroit" considers what it will take to remake The Motor City into a model that will work for the future.
Model D
November 2, 2010, 1pm PDT
Eric Jaffe highlights projects across the country that could be impacted by today's gubernatorial contests.
The Infrastructurist
October 13, 2010, 12pm PDT
A variety of controversial planning policies and high-profile development projects in Melbourne have led to widespread resident frustration, reports The Sydney Morning Herald. Could planning issues change the city's larger political equation?
The Sydney Morning Herald
May 28, 2010, 10am PDT
John Shirey, executive director of the California Redevelopment Association, talks about the recent court ruling that allowed California to take $2 billion in redevelopment from local municipalities, leaving hundreds of projects at risk.
The Planning Report
January 14, 2010, 7am PST
While many of his supporters have criticized President Obama for not acting far or fast enough on their respective causes, Daniel J. Weiss argues that the President's environmental achievements in his first year were significant.
Center for American Progress
Blog post
October 1, 2008, 10am PDT

Almost a month into planning school, I can see the profession’s all about improvisation. How do you think on your feet when a client doesn’t like your design? What other cities can you turn to when a sudden mandate comes down to look for policy innovation?

Or let’s say you’re a planning professor. The financial markets have started a tailspin, eating themselves alive and swallowing MBAs whole. How’s your lesson plan gonna change?

Jeffrey Barg
September 19, 2008, 5am PDT
A new report from the Center for American Progress recommends a 'green' economic overhaul for the U.S. that would create a "comprehensive clean energy transformation" for the country.
The Progress Report
September 11, 2008, 1pm PDT
Most of the news coverage concerning the takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac has failed to note the history: Until 1968, FNMA had always been nationalized.
June 28, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>With unprecedented demand, Amtrak is hampered by years of neglect. The agency is unable to handle all the new customers resulting from high gas prices and plane tickets and is struggling to replace aged equipment and pay for increased fuel costs.</p>
The New York Times
Blog post
March 26, 2008, 3pm PDT

We’ve been conducting public meetings for years. And it used to be easier. Present the plan. Discuss the plan. Talk about how your plan is better for the neighborhood/community/city/region and provide the conclusion. But things have changed.  

Barbara Faga
Blog post
August 20, 2007, 12pm PDT
Like many others, I tuned into the CNN/YouTube debate a few weeks ago. As a firm believer in citizen involvement, to the point of recently writing a book* full of case studies of public process in action, I found CNN’s broadcast of real people with real questions in real time to be utterly fascinating. The public taking hold of technology, influencing candidates with their frank questions, and getting answers that sounded less scripted and on message—it was a sight to see. YouTubers’ questions of the nine Democratic candidates were succinct and to the point. And no, I did not hear the other 3,000 submitted questions, but the ones that aired on live TV were brilliant. Anderson Cooper even quipped that it might be the end of newscasters.
Barbara Faga
Blog post
June 20, 2007, 12pm PDT

Local officials are rightfully leery of someone who shows up at their doorstep and proclaims, "I'm from the U.S. Government ... and I'm here to help you." That probably goes double for the Environmental Protection Agency. But when a team arrives from the EPA’s Smart Growth office, rather than scrambling to bar the door, local officials greet them with open arms — because they really do provide essential assistance.