Stadium Subsidy

After playing just 17 seasons at downtown Atlanta's Turner Field, which was built for the 1996 Olympics, the city's baseball team is giving up their urban home for a new stadium 14 miles northwest of the city.
Nov 12, 2013   DC.Streetsblog
What's made the difference in the trajectories of similarly-sized Midwest cities Detroit and Indianapolis? According to David Masciotra, cross-sector partnerships centered around sports entertainment have been the driving force behind Indy's success.
Aug 13, 2013   The Atlantic Cities
As D.C. debates the value of subsidizing the construction of a soccer stadium on a site in Buzzard Point, Dan Malouff argues that such facilities should be judged as cultural amenities, rather than business investments.
Aug 8, 2013   Greater Greater Washington
Recently it was announced that D.C. had reached a tentative agreement to help fund a new soccer stadium to be built in an area of the city that has long resisted redevelopment. Stadiums are generally a bad deal for cities, but is this an exception?
Aug 3, 2013   Washington City Paper
Falcons owner Arthur Blank and city leaders in Atlanta are pushing to build a new $1 billion football stadium to replace the 20-year-old publicly-financed Georgia Dome. Amid tight budgets some elected officials are concerned with the plan.
Mar 16, 2013   The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
With the Super Bowl just around the corner, it's time to reconsider the allegiance of cities to professional sports teams.
Feb 3, 2013   Next City
As Miami considers using taxes to fund yet another stadium project, analysis indicates the hundreds of millions in public subsidies used for the construction of the city's new baseball stadium will end up costing taxpayers more than $2 billion.
Jan 25, 2013   The Miami Herald