Crime Rates

Blog post
July 26, 2016, 11am PDT
Donald Trump invokes the darkest days of urban decay and crime to appeal to his base. The facts speak to an urban triumph that has led to greater national prosperity and higher standards of living for tens of millions of Americans.
Josh Stephens
December 21, 2015, 7am PST
According to a wide-ranging poll conducted by the Detroit Free Press, residents have regained some optimism about their city and its management. Sixty-nine percent said Detroit is headed in the right direction.
Detroit Free Press
July 22, 2015, 1pm PDT
The city of Philadelphia's Doors and Windows Ordinance applied the Broken Windows Theory to positive results.
Pacific Standard
April 12, 2015, 1pm PDT
A piece from Anchorage, Alaska discusses problems that can arise when planners don't address gender-based safety. Walkable, populated, well-lit streets and transit are the best remedy.
The Arctic Urbanophile
November 22, 2014, 7am PST
James Butts is committed to turning Inglewood around, with economic investment and property development now on the rise.
The Planning Report
June 5, 2013, 2pm PDT
While new data from the FBI shows that violent crime is on the rise across the U.S. after five years of large declines, John Roman and Laura Pacifici argue that the modest increases don't necessarily predict the reversal of long-term trends.
Urban Institute: MetroTrends Blog
May 21, 2013, 12pm PDT
Apologies for being a little late on this one, but apparently last Saturday was the fourth annual 'Take Our Children to the Park...and Leave Them There Day.' Sounds crazy right? Lenore Skenazy argues why it may be the smartest thing you do all week.
Slate
January 24, 2013, 8am PST
San Bernardino was the third city in California to file for bankruptcy last year. Within the past year it has descended from a model of crime reduction to a crime-plagued city.
The New York Times
January 11, 2013, 12pm PST
For decades, researchers have hunted for an explanation for why big cities have been more prone to violent crime than small ones. A new hypothesis may offer a surprising answer, and prove that big cities aren't inherently much more dangerous.
Mother Jones