U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

June 22, 2015, 11am PDT
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has released the environmental impact report for a dam project on the Poudre River in Northern Colorado.
The Denver Post
May 27, 2015, 1pm PDT
The Obama Administration has moved forward with "one of the most controversial environmental regulations in recent years."
The Hill
May 7, 2015, 11am PDT
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers have drafted a new Clean Water Rule to clarify the regulatory powers of the Clan Water Act. In response, some members of Congress authored opposing legislation.
NRDC Switchboard
May 5, 2015, 11am PDT
Home builders fear bans on connections of homes to water systems, issued from the state and cities, will increase next month when Gov. Jerry Brown's new water mandates take effect June 1.
The Wall Street Journal
April 29, 2015, 8am PDT
A long time coming—the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers now supports a comprehensive plan to transform the Trinity River in Dallas.
The Dallas Morning News
March 26, 2015, 9am PDT
Questions are emerging about the funding equation for an ambitious $1 billion proposal to improve 11 miles of the Los Angeles River through some of the most urban parts of the city.
Los Angeles Times
February 10, 2015, 10am PST
The Passaic River, upriver from Newark, is a chronic flood threat to the communities along its banks. But a new plan to build a permanent solution could also block access to the river.
The Record
December 4, 2014, 8am PST
Take a kayak trip on the Los Angeles River with KQED science reporter Amy Standen to understand why cities were built on the premise of endless potable water and how we can build cities sustainably in regions that receive low rainfall.
KQED Science
September 11, 2014, 6am PDT
Laura Barron-Lopez reports on the golf industry's reaction to proposed rules that would expand and clarify the regulatory powers of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers.
The Hill
June 10, 2014, 12pm PDT
President Obama has signed "a bipartisan $12.3 billion water bill that will help improve harbors, waterways, levees, and ecosystems across the United States," according to an article by Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane.
Brookings: The Avenue
May 29, 2014, 9am PDT
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is slowly changing its approach to the Los Angeles River. The executive leadership of the Corps took a major step in a new direction yesterday, when it recommended a $1 billion plan to revitalize the river bed.
Los Angeles Times
May 26, 2014, 7am PDT
After passing the House earlier on a 412-4 vote, the Senate voted 91-7 on May 22 to pass a $12.3 billion water infrastructure bill known as Water Resources Reform and Development Act. It had been seven years since the act was last reauthorized.
The Hill
March 26, 2014, 8am PDT
The death toll in this rural area 55 miles north of Seattle in Snohomish County is expected to rise. Rain had saturated the ground and led to the collapse of a hillside about 600 feet high and 1,500 feet long. But was the slide foreseeable?
USA Today
October 25, 2013, 5am PDT
The U.S. House of Representatives has nearly unanimously passed a new bill! While that's news in itself, the bill facilitates infrastructure improvements (water-oriented in this case), an often divisive issue.
Governing
September 16, 2013, 9am PDT
While the alternative outlined in a long-awaited U.S. Army Corps of Engineers feasibility study envisions a major reshaping of an 11-mile stretch of the L.A. River, the recommendation falls far short of what local leaders and activists had preferred.
Los Angeles Times
September 5, 2013, 12pm PDT
New Jersey has to decide how to protect homes, roads and development from future storms. The Army Corps of Engineers has proposed to build protective sand dunes, but a small number of beachfront property owners refuse to allow the plan to proceed.
The New York Times
July 24, 2013, 12pm PDT
This summer marks a key moment in the effort to transform the Los Angeles River from eyesore to amenity. A newly announced greenway plan and much-delayed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers feasibility study could fundamentally change the river's course.
Los Angeles Times