Higher Education

Blog post
July 31, 2014, 5am PDT
Institutional structure and culture can matter as much as location to the success and survival of urban universities.
Dean Saitta
July 29, 2014, 2pm PDT
Despite the improving economy, the outlook for the higher education sector is still poor, especially between the endowment haves and have-nots. Another factor playing a critical role in the success or failure of institutions: their location.
The Chronicle of Higher Education
January 2, 2014, 7am PST
With nearly $10 billion in construction expected over the next five years (in addition to the $4.2 billion spent over the last five), New York City is in the midst of a higher education building boom being led by investment in science and technology
The Wall Street Journal
Blog post
August 19, 2013, 11am PDT
As college becomes less affordable, alternatives to the traditional four-year model have been making inroads, leading some to question its lasting viability. If universities struggle, it will impact not only campuses, but cities, as well.
Mark Hough
December 15, 2012, 1pm PST
After a decade-long construction arms race at the nation's institutions of higher education, The New York Times looks at what happens when the creditors come calling.
The New York Times
September 13, 2012, 2pm PDT
A growing list of cities are banking their economic development on the medical and educational sectors, which have consistently grown over the past few decades. Aaron Renn examines why overreliance on eds and meds is problematic.
New Geography
October 25, 2011, 8am PDT
Washington DC's office of planning will begin restricting Georgetown's enrollment if the university does not manage to provide housing for 100% of its undergraduates by 2016.
The Washington Post
September 10, 2010, 2pm PDT
Derek Thompson reports on the twenty strongest metro areas and the major factors behind their success in recovering from the recession. He concludes that the country "did not experience an even, cross-country recession."
The Atlantic
Blog post
August 31, 2008, 8am PDT

At the beginning of semester students are signing up for classes and planning their degrees. Lately, a question I have been asked quite frequently is which classes will make new planners most employable? Students ask if computer aided design or GIS will be key. However, surveys of planning practitioners show that a far more basic set of skills is important—skills in communication, information analysis and synthesis, political savvy, and basic workplace competencies and attitudes.

Below, I highlight three of these studies from across three decades:

Ann Forsyth
May 14, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>This article from <em>Governing</em> looks at the role of higher education and medical facilities in keeping urban areas alive.</p>
Blog post
March 9, 2007, 11am PST

Across the U.S., dozens of colleges and universities are planning or building major campus expansions. However, unlike the 1990s which saw gleaming bioscience research facilities appear on campuses, the new construction is calculated to help attract and retain faculty and students with amenities for living and shopping. Almost without exception, these projects are in a strictly neotraditional design mold.

Robert Goodspeed