Height of Buildings Act

March 21, 2014, 7am PDT
Congress is working on increasing height limits in Washington D.C. Rep. Darrell Issa (R-California) based pitching increased the limits by appealing to that fundamental American passion: football.
Roll Call
March 13, 2014, 11am PDT
A strange scene this week: members of Congress discussing height restrictions in one of the country's largest urban centers. In the end, a House committee approved a bill that would loosen D.C.’s century-old Height of Buildings Act.
Washington Business Journal
September 30, 2013, 5am PDT
Although they're not decision-making bodies, D.C.'s Advisory Neighborhood Committees (ANC’s) exert a powerful influence on the city's development process. David M. Schwarz Architects examine whether that's for better or for worse.
Parchment
September 25, 2013, 1pm PDT
In D.C.'s ongoing height limit saga, the other shoe has dropped. Just two weeks after the federal government recommended minimal changes to the limits, their partner in the study - D.C.'s Office of Planning - has come to a very different conclusion.
Washington City Paper
September 12, 2013, 12pm PDT
A congressionally mandated study into potentially altering D.C.'s Height of Buildings Act of 1910, which has kept the city's skyline uniquely low, will recommend small tweaks to the rules and further study of relaxing limits outside downtown.
Greater Greater Washington
July 25, 2013, 12pm PDT
As part of a study into potential changes to D.C.'s Height of Buildings Act requested by Congress, the results of an economic feasibility analysis were presented this week. Relaxing limits would create jobs and several thousand new housing units.
The Washington Post
May 16, 2013, 2pm PDT
A public presentation by the D.C. Office of Planning on the potential for amending the city's controversial height limits revealed residents' many concerns, and little support, for the Congressionally mandated review.
Washington City Paper
November 8, 2012, 2pm PST
In response to a formal request from Congress, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) has agreed to study potential changes to D.C.'s Height of Buildings Act of 1910, a step that could result in the eventual change of the controversial law.
The Washington Post