Hurricane Sandy

Alan G. Brake writes an editorial calling on the architecture and urbanism fields to push even further to reduce carbon emissions by designing (and upgrading) efficient buildings.
Yesterday   The Architect's Newspaper
Last week, Mayor Bloomberg proposed sweeping changes to New York City's building code to better prepare the city's built environment for the increasing threats of rising seas and extreme storms that Hurricane Sandy made clear.
Jun 16, 2013   The New York Times
On Tuesday, Mayor Bloomberg outlined an ambitious $20 billion plan to adapt New York City's infrastructure and built and natural environments to respond to the threats of rising seas and extreme storms.
Jun 12, 2013   The New York Times
This week, Mayor Bloomberg announced the launch of NYC's comprehensive effort to assist homeowners effected by Superstorm Sandy. The NYC Build It Back program will offer avenues for homeowners to restore, rebuild, relocate, or get reimbursed.
Jun 4, 2013   Crain's Business New York
Seven months to the day after Superstorm Sandy ravaged Rockaway, Queens and took out most of the A-line, the subway opened after a round-the-clock, $75 million restoration of much of the line from Howard Beach south. But locals may prefer the ferry!
Jun 2, 2013   Daily News
On Places, Tom Vanderbilt surveys the landscape and politics of New York City after Hurricane Sandy, focusing on both early response and long-range planning.
Jun 1, 2013   Places Journal
Hurricane Sandy made New York's increasing vulnerability to extreme storms apparent, and the need elevate buildings in flood-prone areas imperative. This task is made particularly challenging due to the prevalence of multistory buildings.
May 28, 2013   Crain's New York Business
Just seven months ago Hurricane Sandy damaged 94 percent of New Jersey's beaches and eroded dozens of miles of coastline in New York. As waterfront communities rush to rebuild before summer, some fear disastrous long-term consequences.
May 20, 2013   The New York Times
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, NYC's rail system was up and running again fairly quickly, with only 19 of its rail cars damaged by the storm. By comparison, hundreds of New Jersey Transit's rail cars were damaged and months of delays ensued.
May 13, 2013   WNYC: Transportation Nation
The lack of a single strategy for how to protect the areas devastated by Hurricane Sandy from future storms leaves residents to choose between two unappealing options: rebuild in place and risk future disaster or abandon their neighborhoods.
Apr 9, 2013   Bloomberg
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the news media were fixated on the plight of middle-class homeowners in places like the Rockaways in Queens. But two new reports show that low-income renters were the more prevalent victims of the storm.
Mar 8, 2013   Crain's New York Business