Stormwater Management

May 27, 2016, 8am PDT
In October 2014, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti acted to make the city more resilient from drought and climate change. In 2016, we get an update from leaders Gary Hildebrand and Marty Adams on L.A.'s stormwater capture systems.
The Planning Report
January 3, 2016, 5am PST
Hindsight is 20-20, but so too sometimes is the foresight of geologists. That was the case prior to the flooding that struck St. Louis this December.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
July 13, 2015, 2pm PDT
Existing grey infrastructure in China cannot cope with rapid urban expansion and frequent droughts and floods. Several cities, with Beijing's approval, are experimenting with rainwater capture methods as an alternative.
Environment & Energy Publishing (E&E)
June 26, 2015, 2pm PDT
The state of California, along with county and city officials, have taken several steps forward on plans and projects that could help Los Angeles wean itself from imported water.
Los Angeles Times
December 4, 2014, 8am PST
Take a kayak trip on the Los Angeles River with KQED science reporter Amy Standen to understand why cities were built on the premise of endless potable water and how we can build cities sustainably in regions that receive low rainfall.
KQED Science
July 8, 2014, 8am PDT
The GreaterPlaces website gathered information from the "Shared Stormwater Systems as Economic Incentives" panel at the 2014 APA National Conference to outline how shared stormwater systems can enhance the environment and retain business.
GreaterPlaces
December 22, 2013, 1pm PST
A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council demonstrates that commercial investment in green infrastructure, particularly in stormwater management, can lead to substantial financial benefits for both owners and tenants.
NRDC Switchboard
September 14, 2013, 7am PDT
From permeable paving to green roofs, a number of cost-effective and sustainable strategies have emerged for managing water closer to where it falls, rather than directing it into pipes. SPUR explains 8 promising tools for managing stormwater.
SPUR Blog
September 11, 2013, 2pm PDT
New Orleans is planning a novel approach to managing the city's perpetual threat of floods. Instead of trying to prevent and pump out every last drop, the city will slow and store stormwater under a 50-year, $6.2 billion program of retrofits.
Grist
January 21, 2013, 8am PST
The Rockefeller Foundation unveils its innovative plan to incentivize private investors to provide the infrastructure solutions for eight U.S. cities most vulnerable to extreme storms and rising seas.
The Washington Post
October 19, 2012, 8am PDT
The Clean Water Act turns 40 this week. For Mark Gold, this calls for a celebratory overview of the many environmental successes it has produced, as well as careful consideration of the steps needed for it to be effective in years to come.
Los Angeles Times
June 11, 2012, 9am PDT
With cities across the country seeking to find innovative and economical solutions to problems caused by combined sewer systems, could Philly's popular Green City, Clean Waters program be a model worth copying?
National Geographic News
February 16, 2012, 9am PST
Kate Linthicum reports on a recently completed project in South Los Angeles to turn a former bus yard into a piece of stormwater infrastructure and a public amenity
Los Angeles Times
February 10, 2012, 7am PST
Matt Sledge profiles the work of a landscape architect who has designed an attractive and innovative system for keeping contaminants out of one of New York's most polluted waterways.
Huffington Post
February 4, 2012, 7am PST
Anthony Flint reports on the Buffalo Bayou restoration project in Houston, where a remarkably green sensibility has infused the capital of fossil fuels.
The Atlantic Cities
January 30, 2012, 2pm PST
Christine MacDonald looks at efforts by everyone from home gardeners to municipal water authorities to rethink and rebuild the infrastructure to handle urban runoff.
The Atlantic Cities
Feature
January 30, 2012, 2pm PST

As an emerging area of sustainable practice, Low Impact Development's current one-size-fits-all application is inadequate to effectively fulfill its guiding principles, writes Jonathan Ford

Jonathan Ford
November 15, 2009, 7am PST
Matthew Roth of Streetsblog SF takes a tour of Portland's impressive green streets program from landscape architect David Elkin. Stormwater runoff is a major component of the program, as are new bike lane designs.
Streetsblog
Feature
January 19, 2009, 5am PST
According to the Census Bureau, the United States will have over 400 million people by 2040. How will population growth – 100 million more Americans over the next three decades – impact the quality of your environment? The answer will depend on the choices we make as a society, says James A. LaGro, Jr.
James A. LaGro Jr.