Minorities

February 25, 2010, 7am PST
<em>The Brookings Institution</em> lists out the five biggest myths and misconceptions about the Census and the way demographics change in the U.S.
The Brookings Institution
January 26, 2010, 8am PST
BART's people-mover connection to the Oakland Airport is jeopardized by an FTA ruling that the agency failed to reach out to minorities, potentially denying the agency of $70 million in stimulus funds. Might the funds go to other transit needs?
SF Gate - Oakland Blog
May 15, 2009, 7am PDT
Minorities are on the rise in the U.S., but the rates of growth for Hispanics and Asians are slowing down, according to recent Census figures.
The New York Times
October 29, 2008, 11am PDT
Reportedly, only 1.5% of architects are minorities--but while current black architects gain more respect, it is a good time to reach out to minority youth who might also want to go into architecture.
The Boston Herald
August 8, 2008, 6am PDT
Integrated inner-city public schools were the first to see this phenomenon more than 20 years ago -- classrooms that were predominately children of color. This was attributed to White Flight: the abandoning of the inner city by middle class Caucasians. Not only are minority youth populations the majority of the public school enrollments throughout the country, they are also now a majority of several United States cities and counties.
The New York Times
July 1, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Rezoning in New York's Lower East Side brings the issue of language to the fore, as members of the Spanish and Chinese communities find themselves unable to participate in important decisions about their neighborhoods.</p>
The New York Times
April 3, 2008, 6am PDT
<p>This article from <em>Next American City</em> looks at the decreasing numbers of minority architects and the possible problems this shortage poses to the field and to the planning of cities.</p>
The Next American City
Blog post
March 5, 2007, 1pm PST

Scrambling to grab that elusive “American Dream” of homeownership, millions plunged into the subprime mortgage market to build wealth through appreciation (if not speculation). Pundits cheered as the ownership rate crept up, lauding the pluck of aspirational minority and immigrant families.

There’s a reason it is called subprime, though. Lenders offered a smorgasborg of loan “products,” but the bottom line was that they are all very costly for the borrower – often entailing adjustable-rate surprises in the 30 percent or higher range.

James S. Russell
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