Homeownership

August 22, 2012, 9am PDT
It has long been assumed by politicians, and others, that homeowners are more likely to invest in contributing to the well-being of their neighborhoods than renters. A new report seems to support those assumptions.
Next American City
June 16, 2012, 5am PDT
With home prices at their lowest in a decade and mortgage rates at historic lows, one would thing buying a home now would be significantly cheaper than it was five years ago. Not so, says a new study.
The Wall Street Journal
May 25, 2012, 5am PDT
Sara Robinson explains how the historical view of American homeownership -- that of a life-long commitment to place and "housey goodness" with no expectation of financial gain -- may be coming back.
AlterNet
May 20, 2012, 5am PDT
Kathleen Madigan takes a look at new research that considers the shift in America's living situations, and what it means for consumer behavior.
The Wall Street Journal
May 17, 2012, 7am PDT
Boyd Cohen takes us through a brief tour of the Lion City's many progressive and wildly successful programs, from affordable housing to traffic management and beyond.
Fast Company
February 21, 2012, 5am PST
As single women buy homes in unprecedented quantities, and much more frequently than men, Kate Bolick asks if female homeownership is liberating or limiting.
The Wall Street Journal
February 18, 2012, 11am PST
Jonathan Massey pens an essay in the journal <em>Places</em>, in which he probes the implications of homeownership as the vehicle by which the microeconomics of household finance and the macroeconomics of a globalized economy are mediated.
Places
January 8, 2012, 9am PST
An innovative tenants-rights organization in Boston combines community activism and financial backing to force banks to sell foreclosed homes back to the previous owners.
Shelterforce
December 8, 2010, 2pm PST
According to new research, immigrant homeownership is shifting from large cities like New York and Los Angeles to smaller ones like Las Vegas and Minneapolis.
Miller-McCune
June 21, 2010, 10am PDT
18.6 million American households –renters and homeowners alike – spend more than half their income on housing, according to a new study by Harvard's Joint Center for Housing Studies.
City Limits
May 3, 2010, 9am PDT
Richard Florida writes that Canadians great love for homebuying (with a greater home ownership rate than even the U.S.) could be economically instable.
The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
March 11, 2010, 5am PST
Officials in Reynoldsburg, Ohio are pushing through strict design guidelines with expensive requirements in an attempt to encourage high-end condos over rental apartments.
The Columbus Dispatch
August 21, 2009, 11am PDT
Take two seemingly unrelated words: Flint and Gentrification. Now put them together. What you get is an unexpected rebirth in one part of the struggling city -- a neighborhood where home ownership and community investment are actually increasing.
The New York Times
August 11, 2009, 10am PDT
A new report shows that as the population of the U.S. ages, it is likely that more people will rent than own homes, causing a steep decline in the home building industry.
Calculated Risk
April 22, 2009, 1pm PDT
The Hope for Homeowners Act was designed to allow foreclosed homeowners to keep their homes by drawing up new and more affordable mortgages for qualified applicants. Barney Frank is one of many proclaiming it a failure.
NPR
July 7, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>With housing prices out of reach for many immigrants in the U.S., more and more are investing in houses in their home countries -- and their governments and local lenders are doing all they can to encourage it.</p>
The Boston Globe
June 26, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>Paul Krugman writes that we need to stop conflating owing a home with citizenship.</p>
The New York Times
Blog post
March 25, 2007, 9pm PDT
This week, the Economist’s cover story, "The trouble with the housing market," details the downward-spiraling "subprime" mortgage market and its potential effects on the U.S. economy. The collapsing market certainly poses problems to Wall Street traders and taxpayers in general, but what about the physical toll it's taking on our cities? Abandoned, foreclosed homes now increasingly dot the nation's inner ring suburbs, helping spread neighborhood decline out from inner cities, while developers build more homes farther into the urban periphery.
David Gest
Blog post
March 5, 2007, 1pm PST

Scrambling to grab that elusive “American Dream” of homeownership, millions plunged into the subprime mortgage market to build wealth through appreciation (if not speculation). Pundits cheered as the ownership rate crept up, lauding the pluck of aspirational minority and immigrant families.

There’s a reason it is called subprime, though. Lenders offered a smorgasborg of loan “products,” but the bottom line was that they are all very costly for the borrower – often entailing adjustable-rate surprises in the 30 percent or higher range.

James S. Russell
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