Blog post
February 24, 2016, 5am PST
This blog post highlights resources available to help engage children and young adults in participatory planning processes.
Jennifer Evans-Cowley
April 14, 2015, 8am PDT
What helps make a downtown family friendly? Safe places to play, safe streets, good schools and attainable housing, writes Jennifer Hill.
Community Builders
January 7, 2015, 1pm PST
Jennifer Keesmaat, chief planner and executive director for the city of Toronto, shares tips for how to create safe, fun environments for children.
Active for Life
June 7, 2013, 2pm PDT
Apparently the kids in Japan are just too darn loud. In a country where the old increasingly outnumber the young, crotchety old folks are cracking down on the sounds of childhood.
The Japan Times
May 24, 2011, 11am PDT
Yes, people walk around more, less obesity, etc. But a report shows that city kids are less frequently allowed outside to play for safety concerns.
New Geography
May 15, 2011, 5am PDT
Family makeup is changing in New York City, where unmarried partners are on the rise and households with children are on the decline.
The New York Times
February 2, 2011, 12pm PST
While some cities have focused planning efforts on making their public spaces more accessible for the elderly, some argue that the age group they should be focusing on is kids.
December 28, 2010, 6am PST
Cities are commonly thought of as dangerous places for kids to grow up. But a new study challenges that perception.
October 20, 2010, 9am PDT
Getting kids to walk to school has been a nationwide campaign for years. But some places say it's just not safe. Some urban forms -- like that of Laguna Beach, California -- prove it.
NRDC Switchboard
September 27, 2010, 5am PDT
Two interaction design students in New York are starting a 10-week after school program that is trying to teach high school kids design skills that they can use in their communities.
Urban Omnibus
June 11, 2010, 2pm PDT
The staff of the BUILDblog review the architectural approach, style and design of kid-constructed couch forts.
Build Blog
May 1, 2010, 5am PDT
Trains across the former Soviet Union have peculiar staff: kids. <em>Wired</em>'s <em>Autopia</em> blog explains.
April 29, 2010, 6am PDT
Kids make up a big part of city populations. But often the built environment doesn't reflect a world planned with children in mind. This post from <em>Polis</em> looks at an effort to put children's needs back in the minds of planners.
October 3, 2009, 9am PDT
The Municipal Art Society of New York talks with four young people who are actively involved in addressing the planning challenges facing their communities.
Municipal Art Society
September 24, 2009, 5am PDT
Planners often encounter ineffective public participation because of the fact that citizens often are not taught planning skills in school, says Michael A. Rodriguez.
Michael A. Rodriguez
September 16, 2009, 5am PDT
A new picture book introduces the architecture and urban ideas of Le Corbusier to children.
August 27, 2009, 6am PDT
Unstructured play is a mainstay of childhood. But dense urban areas offer fewer opportunities for free-form playtime, writes Alex Marshall. Kids have to take what they can get, and often it's not much more than an empty parking lot.
Regional Plan Association
August 20, 2009, 7am PDT
A nonprofit program started in 2007 is teaching kids in Kabul, Afghanistan how to skateboard. This slideshow from the <em>Los Angeles Times</em> takes a look.
Los Angeles Times
June 12, 2009, 9am PDT
Ashtabula, Ohio, are updating their zoning codes to be more "kid friendly", as more and more residents are submitting applications to convert homes into day care facilities.
Star Beacon
Blog post
December 15, 2008, 4pm PST
When Chris Steins approached me with his idea to write a kids book about urban planning, I was a little skeptical. We had gotten a hold of a book from 1952 called Neighbor flap foot. The City Planning Frog, by Bill Ewald, Jr. and Merle Henrickson, and to be generous, it wasn’t fit for a modern audience. Here’s a sample:

“Did you know that there is a special rule from City Hall to make sure each house has plenty of light and air, Mickey?” the wise frog asked.
“No, I haven’t heard about that.”
“Well, there is. Blue Nose told me about it,” answered Flap Foot, hopping about to limber up his stiffened legs. “It’s is called zoning. It is a good rule, like brushing your teeth, only this rule is for people who build buildings.”
Tim Halbur