Elections

May 16, 2016, 10am PDT
Spokane, Washington may be at a crossroads as voters consider expanding the city's urban transportation system. Some say it's key to attracting young workers and building a walkable urban environment. Others see it as a waste of money.
The Spokesman-Review
November 28, 2015, 5am PST
A look back at a controversy from this month's Virginia State Senate election, which produced some seriously misleading rhetoric about "toll roads" (i.e., the proposal was for HOT lanes, not a toll road).
Vox
November 2, 2015, 6am PST
This week, voters in Philadelphia will decide on a ballot measure that could realign city government to create a new Department of Planning and Development.
PlanPhilly
August 4, 2015, 1pm PDT
Urban planning is front in center in Nashville, with a general plan update underway and a mayoral election looming on August 6. One candidate took to the editorial pages of The Tennessean to lay out a housing and transit agenda.
The Tennessean
November 4, 2014, 8am PST
There is little, or no, evidence that offering free transit on election day improves voter turnout. Today the Twin Cities will do it anyway for the sake of, hopefully, improving the democratic process.
CityLab
May 15, 2013, 10am PDT
Stepping away from campaign rhetoric, what must the next mayor focus on to ensure a healthy and sustainable future for the largest city on the West Coast? Civic, business, labor, and intellectual readers offer advice to the next Mayor of Los Angeles.
The Planning Report
Blog post
August 22, 2012, 9pm PDT

This morning over at Atlantic Cities, Richard Florida aptly refuted an opinion piece by Kevin Meagher that appeared in the Guardian last week advocating for doing away with the position of Mayor in London. Florida lays out several strong arguments in favor of a strong elected mayor who can act as an advocate for his or her city.

Jess Zimbabwe
Blog post
November 9, 2011, 2pm PST
If you can make it past rhetoric around healthcare, abortion, collective bargaining, and immigration, the November 8th election results tell a more cohesive and calming story about American’s political sentiment. Despite a widespread expressed attitude of “throw the bums out,” incumbent mayors won in every big city race on the ballot yesterday: Baltimore, Charlotte, Houston, Indianapolis, and Philadelphia.
Jess Zimbabwe
October 13, 2010, 12pm PDT
A variety of controversial planning policies and high-profile development projects in Melbourne have led to widespread resident frustration, reports The Sydney Morning Herald. Could planning issues change the city's larger political equation?
The Sydney Morning Herald
August 1, 2010, 5am PDT
Despite what either of the state's two Republican gubernatorial candidates want, high speed rail is on its way to Wisconsin, according to DOT Secretary Ray LaHood.
BizTimes
September 10, 2009, 11am PDT
Seattle is in the midst of a mayoral election, and while typical election issues are getting their own share of lip service from the candidates, land use is being overlooked.
Crosscut
November 2, 2008, 7am PST
City Limits breaks down the differences between the two presidential candidates with a focus on urban issues.
City Limits
September 16, 2008, 2pm PDT
Although it is a public transit success, Metrolink was cobbled together with old freight rail lines. It was a relatively cheap and quick way of providing rail service, but its drawbacks have become obvious.
California Planning and Development Report
Blog post
September 15, 2008, 12am PDT

The battle for the White House has reached my inbox, as even listservs about urbanism crackle with endorsements and denunciations of Obama, McCain, Palin, etc.

But all of this frenzied activity assumes that what a President says or thinks is particularly relevant to urban issues.  But this need not be so.  The policy areas most relevant to sprawl and urbanism, land use and transportation, are not likely to be directly affected by the results of the presidential election.  

In particular, zoning and similar land use issues are generally addressed by state and local governments.  Even the most pro-urban president is unlikely to take on anti-infill NIMBYism (1), make strip malls more walkable. or make streets narrower.  

Michael Lewyn
September 11, 2008, 9am PDT
Elected city officials in dozens of cities want to overturn term limits, saying current ones keep them from being able to tackle long-range projects.
New York Times
July 8, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>The Boston Globe says that when suburbs become denser, 'Democrats promising mass transit become more appealing than Republicans promising to protect gun ownership.'</p>
The Boston Globe
June 4, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Election Day provided a big boost for proponents of redevelopment in California. A statewide measure to restrict use of eminent domain lost badly, while voters in San Francisco and Napa County showed support for redevelopment projects.</p>
California Planning & Development Report
May 16, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>None of the major presidential candidates are paying enough attention to the nation's deteriorating infrastructure, according to this article.</p>
Scholars & Rogues