Economic Segregation

Washington D.C.'s suburbs, where so-called "super zips" of highly educated and highly paid households abound, have become an extreme example of the growing physical segregation of American metros into areas of poverty and affluence.
Nov 11, 2013   The Washington Post
Against a backdrop of increasing spatial segregation of incomes, Robert J. Sampson looks at how neighborhood inequality influences multiple aspects of everyday life. How we address such inequality indicates what kind of society we want to be.
Oct 28, 2013   The New York Times
Isolating poor residents from rich ones is not only bad for those being segregated, it leads to the worst outcomes for a city as a whole. Fighting displacement results in less crime and more stable and healthy communities.
Jan 28, 2013   Rooflines
A quick look at some of Brooklyn's demographic data illustrates a dramatic divide between the Borough's most wealthy and most poor - economic segregation at its extreme in America.
Aug 25, 2012   New York Daily News
A new study breaks down charitable giving by zip code, revealing the great variety in donations by area and economic group. Pam Fessler shares the results.
Aug 21, 2012   NPR