Children

What helps make a downtown family friendly? Safe places to play, safe streets, good schools and attainable housing, writes Jennifer Hill.
Apr 14, 2015   Community Builders
Instead of "Bikers First!" or "Creative Class First!" James Siegel, president of Kaboom!, proposes an alternative for cities: "Kids First!"
Mar 6, 2015   Medium
In a post from the new Plan.Place blog, the author explores the city with a two-year-old as his guide and offers reflections on viewing the urban landscape anew--from an elevation of 34 inches and with a renewed sense of wonder.
Feb 5, 2015   Plan.Place
In an effort to build healthy, active public realms, many cities should considering some of the laws currently on the books that amount to shouting "get off my lawn."
Jan 12, 2015   GOOD Magazine
Next City has published a list of ten "great picture books" that explore urban life for the curious and imaginative children in your life.
Jan 10, 2015   Next City
Do bike helmet laws prevent injuries for children, or do they just discourage children from riding bikes?
Jan 1, 2015   The Incidental Economist
Blog Post
In 1969, American children walked to school as often as not. But today, many parents frown on children doing anything outside while alone. Blog Post
Sep 3, 2014   By Michael Lewyn
Exclusive
An August 19 article in the Washington Post took a tough stance on the value of families to urban settings. Here Bradley Calvert responds by describing how families provide opportunities for planners to rethink cities for the better. Exclusive
Sep 2, 2014  By Bradley Calvert
With the Millennial boom in many urban centers, many cities are looking for ways to retain young families rather than losing them to the traditional suburban exodus. One columnist dares to ask: Do cities even need kids?
Aug 20, 2014   The Washington Post
The ideas generated by a global competition that asks children to design the "dream car of the future" are incredibly aspirational in their pragmatism.
Aug 2, 2014   Fast Co.Exist
Blog Post
In some ways, suburbia has clearly given its residents the benefits they hoped for: newer housing with more space, cheaper housing than in the most fashionable city neighborhoods, and "better" (that is, more racially and economically segregated) schools. Blog Post
Feb 13, 2014   By Michael Lewyn