This weekend, I went to a conference held by Washburn University's law school, in which about two dozen property professors discussed their recent scholarship. Blog Post
Mar 2, 2015   By Michael Lewyn
The unstoppable force paradox is an exercise in logic that seems to come up in the law all too often. There is a Chinese variant. The Chinese word for "paradox" is literally translated as "spear-shield" coming from a story in a Third Century B.C. philosophy book, Han Fiez, about a man selling a sword he claimed could pierce any shield. He also was trying to sell a shield, which he said could resist any sword. He was asked the obvious question and could give no answer. The Washington Supreme Court broke the paradox between a 12-month moratorium during which the City of Woodinville considered sustainable development regulations for its R-1 residential area, and the efforts by the Northshore United Church of Christ (Northshore Church) to host a movable encampment for homeless people on its R-1 property. City of Woodinville v. Northshore United Church of Christ (July 16, 2009). Blog Post
Jul 21, 2009   By Dwight Merriam
Legislators in Oregon are making moves to allow residents to reuse graywater.
Jul 20, 2009   The Statesman Journal
According to the Washington Post, 62% of Americans think Sonia Sotomayor should be confirmed for the U.S Supreme Court because she is "about right" ideologically. The question is, how good will she be for municipal attorneys? Blog Post
Jul 17, 2009   By Dwight Merriam
Last week marked the third anniversary of the Supreme Court's ruling in Kelo v. New London. The first time I read Kelo, I thought what many Americans probably thought: that any government could seize property for any reason, so long as it compensated prior owners. Blog Post
Jul 4, 2008   By Michael Lewyn