Europe

October 25, 2016, 5am PDT
An EU irective calls for charging stations in all new European homes.
The Guardian
May 8, 2015, 10am PDT
Many cities in Europe are rediscovering their pre-automobile roots, using new technologies like ride-sharing and congestion pricing and old-fashioned ones like demolishing parking lots and dense development. Car ownership is dropping precipitously.
The Guardian
March 12, 2015, 2pm PDT
In an interview, architect Renzo Piano says European suburbs are not desolate. He argues they shouldn't be treated as such in the quest for cohesive cities.
WNYC
February 11, 2015, 8am PST
Chuck Wolfe underscores the importance of a holistic view of urban places, referencing themes of common experience, aesthetics, feelings of happiness, safety, or security—a basic narrative of the city that often goes beyond first impressions.
The Huffington Post
January 18, 2015, 5am PST
Throwing money at our housing problems is clearly not the answer, but are there ideas from markets in Europe that might work for us?
Rooflines
December 1, 2012, 11am PST
Derek Thompson discusses the findings of a new study from the Brookings Institution that ranks the world's 300 biggest cities by GDP and job growth over the past year. Put simply, China is growing and Europe is slowing.
The Atlantic
December 14, 2011, 12pm PST
In the fight against climate change, it is still unclear how, according to SustainableCitiesCollective, "the world’s nations will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and achieve limited temperature rise." A recent ECF study sheds light on the topic.
Sustainable Cities Collective
August 16, 2011, 2pm PDT
In interviews with key figures at four of the most influential European architecture firms, the constant theme was that architecture philosophy needs to recognize that eco-friendly design is the future of design innovation.
The Wall Street Journal
April 22, 2011, 1pm PDT
The U.S. often gets a bad rap for its sprawling suburbs and unplanned development, but Robert Kwolek notes that many European cities and other parts of the world aren't far behind.
Sustainable Cities Collective
August 30, 2010, 5am PDT
In Portland, patterns of urban use are emerging that are similar to the European-style neighborhood bar as a community gathering place.
EnzymePDX.com
Blog post
August 8, 2009, 7pm PDT

As a lifelong urbanite, I’ve always felt comfortable learning cities “by Braille.” I put on my walking shoes and wander, making mental maps as I go. I experience serendipity, yet can generally intuit where things are likely to be – the CBD, the government center, nightlife.

This summer our family spent time in Berlin, Venice, Florence, and Paris. Of the four, Paris was the only one I’d been to before. By the time we got there, it was like greeting an old friend.

Lisa Feldstein
June 15, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>The US has never encouraged cycling as a practical mode of travel, and as a result, biking to work is a rare and hazardous activity, with four times the fatality rate of some European countries. A Rutgers University study shows how that can change.</p>
New Urban News
June 13, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Central European cities lead the world in this assessment of 'quality of living.' The survey is oriented towards companies who could locate workers in those countries and need to calculate 'hardship allowances.'</p>
Citymayors.com
June 7, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>GPS from cellphones is enabling exciting research into human behavior, but European studies show that our behavior is rarely exciting.</p>
International Herald Tribune
Blog post
May 13, 2008, 7am PDT

Some commentators argue that sprawl is an inevitable result of affluence, based on European development patterns. These pundits tell a simple story: European urban cores are losing population and becoming more automobile-dependent - just like American cities. So if Europe can’t beat sprawl, neither can America.

Michael Lewyn
Blog post
June 8, 2007, 7am PDT

WARSAW, Poland --I'm on my fourth city in a two-month excursion, and so far I've found all the quaintness, density, pedestrian life, and vernacular architecture that I was looking for as an antitode to my beloved, loathed Los Angeles. The cores of Riga and Vilnius come right out of proverbial fairy tales, and even Helsinki, though historically torn between Sweden and Russia, has plenty of the best trappings of Boston and San Francisco (as well as some of the worst of Atlanta or Dallas; more on that later).

Then there's Warsaw.

Josh Stephens
Blog post
February 27, 2007, 2pm PST

At Project for Public Spaces, Inc. we think successful public spaces are the key to the future of cities. By “successful spaces” we mean spaces that are used, but what we find more often than not, in the centers of cities, are some very bad spaces – meaning that they are pretty much devoid of opportunities to do anything – even though they look good. We have also found that the least successful spaces and buildings are often the newest ones.