Brutalism

A warehouse, electricity substation, and brutalist apartment complex are among the buildings recently granted heritage protection by the British government. Heritage designation for post-war architecture, however, remains contentious.
Sep 23, 2013   The Guardian
Philadelphia's award winning police headquarters, called "the Roundhouse", has received a belated 50th birthday present: the threat of demolition.
Mar 26, 2013   The Architect's Newspaper Blog
The FBI may get the new building it's been clamoring for, and developers may get a prime opportunity on D.C.'s most prestigious avenue, if a recent proposal by the GSA comes to pass. But what will happen to one of the city's last Brutalist buildings?
Dec 5, 2012   The Washington Post
While it doesn't sounds like the most historically sensitive renovation, designLAB's reworking of Paul Rudolph's Carney Library at UMass Dartmouth shows that Brutalist monoliths can be adapted to suit contemporary needs and tastes.
Nov 29, 2012   The Boston Globe
Alex Ulam discusses the challenges of redesigning mid-century urban landscapes to accommodate contemporary tastes and social activities, drawing on examples like Dan Kiley's North Court at Lincoln Center and Boston City Hall Plaza.
Nov 25, 2012   The Architects Newspaper
As D.C.'s J. Edgar Hoover Building reaches the end of its 40 years of service as the headquarters of the FBI, one of the city's last examples of Brutalist architecture is getting little love from preservationists as discussion begin over its fate.
Oct 29, 2012   The Washington Post
While proponents for the preservation of Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center won a reprieve last week, Anthony Paletta is more concerned with the types of civic architecture the Rudolph building's critics would hope to construct.
May 9, 2012   Metropolis POV Blog
Jumping into the lively debate over the future of Paul Rudolph's brutalist government building in Goshen, NY, <em>The New York Times</em> has asked a number of debaters to weigh in on whether even ugly, unpopular buildings deserve to be saved.
Apr 9, 2012   The New York Times
Love it or hate it, it's nearly impossible not to have an opinion of Boston's brutalist City Hall building. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of its conception, Leon Neyfakh reports on the improbable story of its creation.
Feb 13, 2012   The Boston Globe
Llewellyn Hinkes-Jones makes a strong argument for why ugly buildings deserve some love.
Jan 12, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Critic Christopher Hume says that "an architecture of openness" is overtaking Toronto, foregoing individual personality for a greater sense of community and connectivity.
Mar 31, 2011   The Toronto Star