Hurricane Katrina

A pair of articles in the Times-Picayune, along with a new study from advocacy group Ride New Orleans, finds the transit system in New Orleans doing less with more.
Jul 17, 2014   The Times-Picayune
A federal judge has ruled that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' mismanaged maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet was the cause of flood damage in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.
Nov 20, 2009   New Orleans Times-Picayune
A judge rules in favor of plaintiffs who lost their homes to Hurricane Katrina in a case against the Army Corps of Engineers, saying they failed to properly maintain a navigation channel.
Nov 19, 2009   The New York Times
A video interview with Ed Blakely, former New Orleans recovery czar, reveals some tensions with the city, its officials, and its people that hindered the recovery process.
Nov 13, 2009   New Orleans Times-Picayune
Housing development, architecture and community building have found a new learning lab in the lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans.
Oct 19, 2009   The Atlantic
Recovery in New Orleans doesn't just mean rebuilding the city as it was before Hurricane Katrina. Some see the process as creating an entirely new city.
Sep 1, 2009   The New York Times
Entrepreneurs are flocking to New Orleans, a boom that some expect to help bring employment levels 98.8% of the way back to pre-Hurricane Katrina levels by 2016.
Aug 2, 2009   The New York Times
Rebuilding is underway in New Orleans. But not with huge conglomerates running the show. Most of the work is being done by non-profits, startups and other community-based organizations.
Jul 28, 2009   WorldChanging
The Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans was deluged in the post-Katrina flooding. Today, a new community emerges with traditional renovations living side-by side with unique contemporary buildings.
Jul 8, 2009   The Times-Picayune
Thousands of families who are still living in temporary trailers after Hurricane Katrina face uncertainty in their housing this summer.
Jun 16, 2009   The Boston Globe
Hurricane victims on the Gulf Coast can still live in government-provided trailers to buy their temporary homes for only $1, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
Jun 5, 2009   Los Angeles Times