Hong Kong

July 18, 2016, 6am PDT
International borders viewed from above show how different patterns of political, urban and agricultural development often collide.
December 11, 2015, 6am PST
Created with input from historian Mark Footer, this tool overlays street views of modern Hong Kong with historical photos from the colonial era through the 20th century.
May 30, 2015, 5am PDT
Cartographer Jeffrey Linn has compiled maps of how coastal China would look under risen seas. Over 40 percent of the country's population lives in potentially affected regions.
China File
May 23, 2014, 5am PDT
Michael Wolf is a 60-year-old German photojournalist living in Hong Kong. In a recent interview, he describes his various projects in capturing the lives of the millions who call Asian megacities home.
August 21, 2013, 2pm PDT
In dizzying towers of dozens of monotonous, yet colorful, stories, Hong Kong residents make their homes in apartments that average 400 square feet. For photographer Michael Wolf the stark high-rise landscape provides powerful subject matter.
February 23, 2013, 5am PST
Los Angeles County Planner Dr. Clement Lau reviews "The Art of Urban Sketching" (2012) by Gabriel Campanario. The volume has added to his planning skill set and allowed him to discover his inner artist.
January 6, 2013, 11am PST
As this video from The Perennial Plate, a web series about sustainable food, demonstrates, rooftop gardening is becoming a global phenomenon.
The Atlantic
January 5, 2013, 5am PST
In Hong Kong, new government policies to curb real estate speculation in housing markets have led investors to turn elsewhere for quick, lucrative profits - the market for parking spaces.
Los Angeles Times - Business
November 15, 2012, 9am PST
Hong Kong has supplanted New York atop Cushman & Wakefield's list of the ten most expensive shopping streets in the world. London's Bond Street fell out of the top ten due to Britain's weak economy.
Business Insider
October 7, 2012, 1pm PDT
In one of the world's most dense cities, urban agriculture finds its place on the rooftops of Hong Kong buildings. Fears of tainted imports is spurring much of the growth.
The New York Times
August 27, 2012, 5am PDT
Nate Berg looks at how Hong Kong's unique pedestrian infrastructure of elevated walkways and underground tunnels has affected the city's use of public and private spaces, and shifted urban behaviors.
The Atlantic Cities
August 20, 2012, 1pm PDT
Bill Hooper looks at the global effort to reinvent the airport as a place where people will actually <em>want</em> to spend time.
Fast Company Co.Exist
August 9, 2012, 7am PDT
Leading the way in establishing Hong Kong's ambitious new $2.8 cultural district is the M+ Museum, which, at more than twice the size of the Tate Modern, intends to be Hong Kong’s answer to the Centre Pompidou or the Guggenheim in Bilbao.
April 12, 2012, 11am PDT
Richard Florida explores the rankings of the top global cities for the ultra-rich, as detailed in the 2012 Wealth Report released by real estate firm Knight Frank and Citi Private Bank.
The Atlantic Cities
February 11, 2012, 11am PST
In this video, host Richard Quest takes us underground to view the work firsthand, where two explosions occur daily right underneath dense city blocks.
CNN Business 360
December 25, 2011, 9am PST
Can Honduras develop it's own Hong Kong by enabling free market "startup cities"? The sleepy city of Trujillo is selected for the country's first experiment.
The Economist
August 10, 2011, 9am PDT
Public transit is expensive, and most transit agencies don't make money. But Hong Kong's MTR is different.
July 26, 2011, 7am PDT
For a city of over 16,000 people per square mile, less than 7% of Hong Kong's land is designated for residential use. Subdivided apartments - aka "coffin units" - totaling 150 square feet aren't uncommon, reports The Wall Street Journal.
The Wall Street Journal
June 30, 2011, 7am PDT
The personally rewarding and healthy activity of urban farming continues to solidify a foothold on Hong Kong high rises, in spite of the lack of support from the government.
May 17, 2011, 6am PDT
Policy in Hong Kong dictates that development must concentrate on only 25% of the land area, with the remaining 75% preserved as open space. Julia Levitt examines the ingenious density that results.
Metropolis Magazine