iPhone

Steve Jobs said, "People don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” So why do planners keep asking people what they'd like to see? Scott Doyon believes it's time to dig deeper.
Jan 25, 2013   PlaceShakers
Shoup might love it or hate it. Rather than allowing the city, neighborhood, or homeowner to profit from unpriced curb parking by establishing a “parking benefit district”, the transient motorist auctions the spot upon departure...on an iPhone!
Sep 1, 2011   DNAinfo.com
Houston Neal from Software Advice picks the best apps for construction, from carpentry and electrical calculators to design tools like REVIT and Google SketchUp.
Aug 29, 2010   Software Advice
A new App from the Museum of London uses geo tagging and Google Maps to identify locations seen in their artwork, giving users the ability to see how the historic site used to look.
May 25, 2010   Creative Review
Yahoo has released a new iPhone app that allows users to draw a circle on a map around the area he or she wants to search.
Mar 24, 2010   The Christian Science Monitor
Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority (CTRMA) is about to test run a system where drivers can pay their toll using only their iPhone, Blackberry, or MS Windows Mobile-enabled phone.
Feb 4, 2010   TOLLROADSnews
A friend of mine who's a biophysicist popped in to see me the other day.  He was all excited and showed me his "patent pending" letter for his newest invention. Opinion
Dec 23, 2009   By Steven Polzin
What's better than Twitter in the city? An iPhone. With a connection to the Internet, built-in camera, location-awareness, 3-access accelerometer and colorful display, the Apple iPhone has become much more than a mobile phone: it's a sophisticated mobile computing platform. Opinion
Sep 7, 2009   By Robert Goodspeed
The City of Pittsburgh, PA yesterday released an iPhone app that allows you to take pictures of potholes and send a complaint directly to the city.
Aug 18, 2009   KDKA2
<p>The use of geographic information systems for the public good is a rapidly growing field. The technology shows great promise for discovering unequal distribution of resources and environmental racism, writes Peter Manzo.</p>
Jun 18, 2008   Stanford Social Innovation Review