Infill

The market forces that push developers and landowners to build “more” and “bigger” have cropped up in some of the swankiest neighborhoods in Portland. So far, neighbors who oppose the projects are finding scant legal recourse to prevent the changes.
Mar 13, 2014   The Oregonian
That's the conclusion of a new report by The Long Island Index. Equal development can be achieved by building into the island's last greenfields or upwards from infill opportunities like underused parking lots.
Mar 9, 2010   Grist
Kaid Benfield reads ULI's latest 'Emerging Trends' report, and finds, amidst the doom and gloom, significant support for infill and smart growth.
Nov 10, 2009   NRDC Blog
After an unstoppable run of megaprojects being built with an eye on the Olympics, architects are now designing smaller, human-scale projects in between the cracks.
Aug 18, 2009   Asia Times
Portland, Oregon sees the revival of building styles not seen since the last time streetcars rolled through the city.
Jun 18, 2009   The Oregonian
Salt Lake City has seen its share of foreclosure in its outer suburbs. Local planners and urban planning professors see this as an opportunity to convince locals of the benefits of city living.
Apr 14, 2009   Deseret News
This report takes a local perspective on CA's new land use law, in the context of two preceding environmental laws, CEQA and AB 32. While the former enabled activists to fight new growth, the pendulum has begun to swing toward developers.
Feb 12, 2009   The Berkeley Daily Planet
<p>Urban infill developments are slated to transform the vast industrial land between Charleston and North Charleston, South Carolina, known as "the Neck" area, into live-work communities that stitch the two cities together.</p>
Apr 22, 2008   Charleston Business Journal
<p>California water quality regulators continue to levy ever-tougher standards for stormwater runoff. But the standards could impact development and cities in a way that is not best for the environment at large.</p>
Apr 11, 2008   California Planning & Development Report
<p>While planners generally sell plans with "integrated infill" and "elegant density" that pairs new development with public amenities, the reality of what gets built in neighborhoods isn't always what's promised.</p>
Apr 7, 2008   The Oregonian