Religion

A unique blend of religious beliefs, state policies and capitalist interests are reshaping Mecca for the worse, critics argue, at the expense of its most prized cultural assets.
Oct 27, 2012   The Guardian
The tussle over the historic designation of a property owned by a Chicago church exposes the conflicting agendas of politics, property rights, preservation, and constitutional law.
Sep 2, 2012   Gapers Block
Dr. Ralf Brand and Dr. Sara Fregonese have studied how culturally ignorant design has intensified violence in areas of religious and ethnic division, while more sensitive plans have peacefully brought people from different backgrounds together.
Jun 14, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Unlike Asia and South America, sub-Saharan Africa did not see birthrates fall in the second half of the 20th century. As a result, urban life in Nigeria heralds the challenges facing an increasingly populous planet, Elisabeth Rosenthal reports.
Apr 18, 2012   The New York Times
According to Alain de Botton, religion shouldn't get to claim the most beautiful buildings, so he proposes a temple for anything else "positive and good," right in the center of London.
Feb 2, 2012   Fast Company
Governmental support for plans for a religious theme park in Kentucky featuring a replica of Noah's Ark have spurred protests.
Mar 11, 2011   NPR
The Archdiocese of Detroit is working with city planners and local demographers as they develop their plans for Catholic parish closures.
Dec 22, 2010   The Detroit News
The concept of ripeness in several realms is elusive. I have never figured out how to properly thump a melon at a grocery store, although I have made a thorough study of it. You might want to click here, or here, or here for some guidance, none of which seems to work when it's just me in a stare down with a cold, stone faced and silent honeydew. Just yesterday one of my younger children from what we call the "second litter" asked me at dinner how I could tell if a coconut was ripe. I paused, realized that I had no answer, and did what every good parent should do and asked instead why they weren't eating their salad. Yes, attack and divert. You think melons and coconuts are tough - try ripeness in land use litigation. Opinion
Jul 28, 2009   By Dwight Merriam
The unstoppable force paradox is an exercise in logic that seems to come up in the law all too often. There is a Chinese variant. The Chinese word for "paradox" is literally translated as "spear-shield" coming from a story in a Third Century B.C. philosophy book, Han Fiez, about a man selling a sword he claimed could pierce any shield. He also was trying to sell a shield, which he said could resist any sword. He was asked the obvious question and could give no answer. The Washington Supreme Court broke the paradox between a 12-month moratorium during which the City of Woodinville considered sustainable development regulations for its R-1 residential area, and the efforts by the Northshore United Church of Christ (Northshore Church) to host a movable encampment for homeless people on its R-1 property. City of Woodinville v. Northshore United Church of Christ (July 16, 2009). Opinion
Jul 21, 2009   By Dwight Merriam
After a church in Denver was denied permission to expand its facilities, they filed a lawsuit against Boulder County on charges of discrimination. This month, the case reached a federal courtroom.
Nov 19, 2008   Los Angeles Times
<p>Vancouverites send a sculpture packing, stirring up a debate over the role of public art.</p>
Jun 13, 2008   The Canadian Press