Gas Taxes

For the first time, a new law allows Colorado's cities and counties to spend revenue raised by the state's fuel sales taxes and license plate fees on projects other than roads and bridges.
May 6, 2013   The Denver Post
<p>Keep gas and diesel taxes stable and add new road tolls and private investment, and the road funding deficit will be solved, according to the new Bush transportation plan released July 30.</p>
Jul 31, 2008   The Wall Street Journal
<p>At a time when highway infrastructure is already facing challenges such as the rising costs of concrete and steel, a change in driving habits is causing a major reduction in available funds.</p>
Jul 29, 2008   The Wall St. Journal
<p>Yet another unforeseen consequence of high gasoline prices and less driving: the gas tax-funded federal highway trust fund is being depleted, putting states' highway project funding in danger.</p>
Jul 22, 2008   The Los Angeles Times
<p>Conservative columnist Charles Krauthammer notes high gas prices are doing what Congress has taken decades to do – make the vehicle fleet more fuel efficient. He sees Congress repeating the mistake now with cap and trade - instead of gas taxes.</p>
Jul 9, 2008   The Washington Post
<p>As drivers complain about higher gas prices, one California lawmaker is promoting a new 9 cent fee on gasoline to fund public transportation and congestion relief in Los Angeles County.</p>
Jun 4, 2008   NPR
<p>With gas averaging $3.45 a gallon, the U.S. still only ranks as the 110th most expensive place to buy gas -- out of 155 countries.</p>
May 1, 2008   CNN Money
<p>New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman holds no punches in expressing his displeasure in the 'gas tax holiday' proposal now that presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has joined presumptive Republican nominee John McCain in endorsing it.</p>
Apr 30, 2008   The New York Times
<p>With the nation's infrastructure in dire need of investment, a debate over the need to raise the federal gas tax is brewing in Washington, D.C.</p>
Apr 22, 2008   CNN Money
<p>Bay Area political columnist Dan Borenstein examines long-term transportation data and concludes that driving will only increase unless politicians make driving more expensive and transit cheaper, a solution he regards as unlikely at best.</p>
Mar 12, 2008   The Contra Costa Times