South Africa

December 10, 2013, 1pm PST
In manicured neighborhoods for white residents and their "shriveled twins" for black residents, South Africa's nearly 50 years of Apartheid was imprinted on the nation's built landscape. To what extent was Nelson Mandela able to right these wrongs?
ArchDaily
April 8, 2013, 5am PDT
Twenty years after the end of apartheid in South Africa, Cape Town is preparing to become World Design Capital. Zoe Dare Hall looks at the coastal city's burgeoning real estate market, which reflects two decades of integrative planning.
Financial Times
December 31, 2012, 7am PST
Bicyclists are hard to come by in South Africa. Two authors have gone in search of the reasons why a country with "so much poverty, often unwalkable commuter distances, and poor public transportation," lacks a larger bike culture.
Los Angeles Times
November 20, 2012, 12pm PST
In the latest entry in a series on informal urban livelihoods, Sally Roever of WIEGO provides insight into how planners can better understand, acknowledge and manage street vending through the development of appropriate policies and best practices.
The Global Urbanist
November 8, 2012, 5am PST
In a project initiated by the Sustainability Institute, and backed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, development experts are taking innovative steps to address South Africa’s housing shortage.
The New York Times
October 31, 2012, 7am PDT
Qatar Airlines is gearing up their jets to run on a fuel derived from natural gas - so don't expect to see fuel tanks holding liquefied gas. Similar to the "Messerschmitt Fuel" in World War II that was derived from coal, they are called synfuels.
The New York Times - Green Blog
September 10, 2012, 1pm PDT
Writing for <em>Yahoo! Travel</em>, Aefa Mulholland identifies five of the most dangerous roads in the world - from India's chaotic city streets to Bolivia's mountain hugging back roads.
Yahoo! Travel
November 17, 2011, 2pm PST
Lisa Findley & Liz Ogbu explain how architecture and urban planning were critical to apartheid in South Africa and how Le Corbusier and Ebenezer Howard influenced the racial segregation practice.
Design Observer
August 30, 2011, 1pm PDT
New government efforts in South Africa are trying to improve mobility for those who rely on public transportation, walking and biking.
This Big City
July 26, 2011, 8am PDT
One year after it hosted the World Cup, South Africa is looking at empty and expensive stadia and a persistent debt that's causing some to regret hosting the soccer tournament.
The New York Times Magazine
May 31, 2011, 11am PDT
Minibus drivers in Johannesburg, South Africa, were not happy about plans to build a city-wide bus rapid transit system, worrying it would take their business away. After sometimes violent debates, the drivers have compromised with the city.
Citiscope
March 4, 2011, 9am PST
Gold mining was an integral part of what made the city of Johannesburg, South Africa one of the most economically important cities on the continent. But as mining winds down, some are trying to find new ways to use the landscape of mining operations.
Places
December 29, 2010, 2pm PST
Garrett Bradford of TheCityFix reviews some of the most innovative and sustainable transit systems from around the globe that made their debut over the last twelve months.
TheCityFix
November 15, 2010, 7am PST
Just months after the completion of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, expensive stadia built for the event sit empty and unused.
Bleacher Report
September 4, 2010, 5am PDT
Pedestrianism is on the rise in Cape Town, South Africa, where the recent World Cup has inspired more citizens to get out of their cars and put their feet on the street.
The Christian Science Monitor
Feature
August 2, 2010, 9am PDT
The 2010 World Cup has ended in South Africa. What's left behind are a number of physical and cultural legacies that will be both landmark developments and potential economic hazards.
Nate Berg
July 12, 2010, 10am PDT
Officials in South Africa say the country's successful hosting of the 2010 World Cup positions it to be a viable host for the Olympics.
Guardian
Blog post
July 12, 2010, 9am PDT

Spanish football fans are celebrating in the streets, while in The Netherlands they are drowning their sorrows, but the real winners of the 2010 World Cup are the people of South Africa. Long after the last vuvuzela is sounded, residents and visitors will enjoy the legacy of new Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems build in South Africa’s four major cities.

 

Todd Litman
June 14, 2010, 9am PDT
The 2010 World Cup in South Africa has caused the creation or redesign of ten stadia. <em>The Architect's Newspaper</em> offers this list of four of the most interesting stadia and what future these expensive buildings may have.
The Architect's Newspaper
June 9, 2010, 6am PDT
<em>The Infrastructurist</em> points to this infographic that outlines the expenditures and infrastructure projects that were built to accommodate the World Cup, beginning this Friday in South Africa.
Infrastructurist