Business

Tanya Snyder examines the various ways in which bicyclists bring increased business and added value to their local communities.
Apr 30, 2012   DC Streetsblog
Jordan Royer weighs in on two major developments in the Emerald City, and why the one that flew under the radar should have taken center stage.
Feb 24, 2012   Crosscut
After being hidden in plain sight for decades, Canada now emerges as the hot spot for U.S. "international" investment.
Jun 19, 2011   Retail Traffic
Cities around the world are applying business-style techniques to planning and encouraging economic development.
Dec 29, 2010   Citiwire
So says William Fulton, mayor of Ventura and longtime writer on economic development issues. He says that economic growth is a "mysterious process" that can't be won by wooing a big employer to your town.
Nov 16, 2010   Citiwire.net
Bringing economic vitality back to Cleveland requires a broad embrace of policies that encourage entrepreneurship, according to <em>Reason</em>'s Sam Staley.
Mar 20, 2010   Reason
When all business happens over the internet, does where your business still matter? Yes, says Business Insider, for all the same reasons as before.
Mar 6, 2010   Business Insider
Growth is at a standstill in most western boomtowns, but not in well-planned, thriving South Jordan, UT. An expedited permitting process and good planning are given credit as catalysts for growth.
Nov 5, 2009   Desert News
As U.S.-Cuba relations evolve with a new presidential administration, author Richard Louv argues that officials should be careful about relying on commerce to save the country's decaying urban areas without preserving them.
Jan 12, 2009   Citiwire
A new GIS-based service promises to improve on real estate agents by using GIS data to locate promising sites to locate for business.
Jan 9, 2009   BusinessWeek
The economic boost expected from Olympics-related tourism has fallen way short of predictions in Beijing. Many business people blame the government's stringent visa-granting policies.
Aug 19, 2008   The Christian Science Monitor