guerrilla urbanism

February 17, 2014, 10am PST
A recent guerrilla campaign designed to ease train-to-train transfer on the New York subway displeased both the MTA and regular commuters.
Next City
July 17, 2013, 11am PDT
Recently, we told you about what may have been the friendliest correspondence ever conducted over the installation and removal of an illicit protected bike lane. We can now report an even happier ending: the implementation of a permanent solution.
Seattle Bike Blog
June 4, 2013, 10am PDT
The arrest of a Vallejo, California man for painting a crosswalk at a dangerous intersection near his home is the latest guerrilla urbanist intervention to run afoul of the law.
CBS Sacramento
May 11, 2013, 7am PDT
A series of tactical urbanist interventions inspired by a recent talk given by Mike Lydon, Principal of the Street Plans Collaborative, have raised the ire of the powers that be in the Canadian city of Hamilton.
Raise the Hammer
April 7, 2013, 9am PDT
In what is certainly one of the most polite forms of civil disobedience we've ever encountered, a small group of guerrilla urbanists installed bike lane protectors along a Seattle street one recent night. They kindly made them easy to remove.
Seattle Bike Blog
August 24, 2012, 12pm PDT
One of the highlights of the global architectural calendar, the Biennale is a place to share and discuss the big ideas impacting the field. For this year's U.S. Pavilion, curators are going small by showcasing 124 projects by self-empowered citizens.
Art Info
July 9, 2012, 6am PDT
Alexandria Abramian Mott spotlights several grassroots ways -- from signs to screams -- in which "fed-up residents are reclaiming their streets, or at least trying to."
Los Angeles Times
February 24, 2012, 1pm PST
A widely publicized guerrilla wayfinding campaign meant to give helpful guidance and encouragement to those exploring the city of Raleigh on foot has been quashed by the City Planning Director, report Chelsea Kellner and Bruce Siceloff.
The News & Observer
December 17, 2011, 9am PST
Writing in Grist, Chuck Wolfe provides a counterintuitive look at what to do about potholes and how they could become "the universal darlings of walkable urbanism".
Grist