vouchers

March 9, 2016, 10am PST
A Harvard sociologist and author of "Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City" supports a large expansion of housing vouchers to rebalance the scales of the housing market.
The New York Times
August 28, 2015, 6am PDT
“A narrative of rebirth, reform and success that coexists with a narrative of stasis, failure and unrealized dreams.”
The New York Times
October 21, 2014, 5am PDT
Can a $52 million plan to close the D.C. General emergency shelter rely on the generosity of landlords in providing houses for the homeless?
The Washington Post
April 3, 2014, 8am PDT
Many advocates for new ways of thinking about places and streets argue for reduced use of cars as the dominant mode of transportation. A new study finds, however that poverty is improved when the poor have access to a car for transportation.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
March 31, 2014, 1pm PDT
A new paper published in the Urban Studies journal finds a weak, negative relationship between vouchers and violent crime rates. There is no observable relationship between vouchers and violent crime rates in suburban areas.
Urban Studies
Blog post
October 13, 2011, 12pm PDT
The terms Central city, Inner city and urban have long been synonymous with the poorer, disadvantaged minority sections of metropolitan areas. Conversely, the suburbs have been associated with whites, affluence and job growth. For a long time, however, this dichotomy has failed to capture the gradual blurring of distinctive patterns that demarcate city from suburb. A recent Brookings report by Kenya Covington, Michael Stoll and yours truly underscores this point. The Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program, the single largest affordable housing program in the country is almost as prevalent in the suburbs as in central cities.
Lance Freeman
Blog post
September 26, 2011, 5pm PDT

One of the greatest challenges for US cities is the perceived failure of public schools. Both as a means for attracting and retaining the middle class and for providing upward mobility public schools are crucial. Consequently, any effort to build livable cities must include successful public schools so as to provide a ladder for the poor and to attract and retain the middle class. Although education typically falls out of the purview of planning, planners can ill afford to ignore such a key component of what makes a place livable in the minds of many.

Lance Freeman