Density

July 31, 2012, 6am PDT
In an urbanizing world, density is being recognized for its ability to stimulate the "metabolism of daily life." In an essay for <em>The Wall Street Journal</em>, Richard Florida argues that all density is not created equal, however.
The Wall Street Journal
July 29, 2012, 11am PDT
For a city of its size, London and its skyline are notoriously flat. Now, as the city struggles to expand its housing stock to meet the needs of it surging population, increasingly taller solutions are being prescribed, concerning some.
The Global Urbanist
June 29, 2012, 9am PDT
David Steel explains how Buffalo's zoning code not only makes it impossible to build the type of neighborhoods people love, but also guarantees that low density development pays less taxes.
Rust Wire
June 21, 2012, 10am PDT
Announced this week by <em>All Things Considered</em> hosts Melissa Block and Robert Siegel, National Public Radio is launching a new series called the NPR Cities Project and they're asking listeners for their input.
NPR
June 1, 2012, 7am PDT
While raw density numbers are sure to pick a fight, discussing character-based building typologies one neighborhood at a time may help find common ground.
PlaceShakers
May 24, 2012, 5am PDT
Roger Valdez gives his take on the new obstructionism that is dominating public participation and holding up much-needed growth in Seattle and elsewhere.
Crosscut
May 15, 2012, 5am PDT
Arguing for the value of historic low and mid-rise, but also dense, areas of Brooklyn, Washington D.C., and New Orleans, Edward T. McMahon asks us to reconsider the pursuit of density as an end in itself, and the high-rise as its fullest expression.
Citiwire.net
May 10, 2012, 12pm PDT
Trying to thread the needle between those who celebrate the demise of the exurb and those who bemoan smart growth policies, Edward Glaeser argues that we can, and should, have it all when it comes to housing choice in America.
Bloomberg View
April 23, 2012, 9am PDT
A recent article from Richard Florida shows that the size and density of cities offers considerable advantages to the environment, beyond what is commonly understood.
The Atlantic Cities
April 18, 2012, 7am PDT
Will Oremus investigates an occurrence he noticed recently in Tom Vanderbilt's series on walking – that the cities with the highest "walk scores" were all liberal – and asks why conservative cities don't walk.
Slate
April 18, 2012, 5am PDT
As wealthy communities learn to use historic districts to inflate property values, socially conscious urbanists must think twice about the purpose and place of preservation, Will Doig reports.
Salon
April 9, 2012, 5am PDT
New research suggests that the electrification of automobiles can undermine planning efforts to create denser development patterns and may work against policies that encourage non-motorized forms of mobility, such as biking and walking.
European Planning Studies
April 3, 2012, 10am PDT
Census data reveals that California is the most urbanized state, with the most dense urban areas. But in California, sprawl, density, crowding, and urbanism are not always what they seem. Fortunately, a new law may help planners make sense of it all.
California Planning & Development Report
April 2, 2012, 7am PDT
A conference held in London last Tuesday, called "Planet Under Pressure," provided a forum to begin to answer the question, reports Roxanne Palmer.
International Business Times
Feature
March 30, 2012, 9am PDT

In advance of next month's National Planning Conference, the APA and editor David C. Sloane, have produced the landmark book, Planning Los Angeles.

Jonathan Nettler
March 13, 2012, 2pm PDT
Inspired by three books published in the last year that help to elucidate the role of cities and density in making people and countries richer, Ezra Klein compiles some lessons for economic development in the United States.
The Washington Post
Blog post
March 7, 2012, 3pm PST

In For A New Liberty, libertarian intellectual Murray Rothbard writes that leftist intellectuals had raised a variety of complaints against capitalism, and that "each of those complaints has been contradictory to one or more of their predecessors.”  In the 1930s, leftists argued that capitalism was prone to ‘eternal stagnation”, while in the 1960s, they argued that capitalist economies had “grown too much” causing “excessive affluence” and exhaustion of the world’s resources.  And so on.

Michael Lewyn
March 6, 2012, 7am PST
Mark Hinshaw calls an end to the use of the term "suburb" to describe the communities ringing Seattle, and the inferior connotations attached to it. It's a term that he thinks has outlived its usefulness.
Crosscut
Blog post
January 1, 2012, 3pm PST

I had heard of “dense sprawl” and “density without walkability” in the past, but before spending a week in Jerusalem last month, I had never really lived through these problems.

My parents (who I was staying with) rented a unit in a high-rise condo complex called Holyland Tower.  Although Holyland Tower was the tallest building in the area, there were numerous mid-rise buildings, and lots of two-and three-story apartment and condo buildings.  While walking through the idea, I saw nothing resembling a single-family home.  In sum, this area was a pretty dense neighborhood in a pretty dense city (Jerusalem’s overall density is roughly comparable to that of the city of San Francisco).

Michael Lewyn
October 31, 2011, 5am PDT
David Baker Architects latest public housing project in Oakland, California shows that high-density living can be attractive and feature a variety of housing types, writes Allison Arieff.
The Atlantic Cities