Demographic Data

May 1, 2016, 9am PDT
The common perception of everyday America as a land of small towns and white faces doesn't reflect the current reality. Demographic analysis reveals "normal America" in cities like New Haven and Tampa.
FiveThirtyEight
July 17, 2015, 10am PDT
A decade ago many of Virginia's rural counties were among the fastest growing in the country, but in most of Virginia's counties deaths now outnumber births, and county populations are consequently growing more slowly or declining.
University of Virginia Center for Public Service
October 10, 2014, 1pm PDT
Esri offers a new product called Tapestry Segmentation, which overlays geography with U.S. Census and marketing data.
The Wall Street Journal
Blog post
September 1, 2011, 7am PDT

Historically, data sources for urban planning have remained relatively stable. Planners relied on a collection of well-known government-produced datasets to do their work, including statistics and geographic layers from federal, state and local sources. Produced by regulatory processes or occasional surveys, the strengths and limitations of these sources are well known to planners and many citizens. However all this is beginning to change. Not only has the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey introduced a bewildering variety of data products, all with margins of error, three interrelated categories of new data are growing rapidly: crowdsourced, private, and "big" data.

Robert Goodspeed
Blog post
December 21, 2008, 12pm PST

Four months, thousands of pages and $60 worth of printing later, my first semester of planning school is over.

Really? That’s it?

Not that I was understimulated. Plenty of big assignments kept me up later than my girlfriend would’ve liked. But in the working world, four months isn’t that long—it’s a big project, a new initiative. In grad school, apparently, it’s reason enough to take a month off.

So without any further ado, a few highlights and lowlights from the first semester. Not too many lowlights, though. A few of my professors read this blog.

Jeffrey Barg