Public Participation

May 12, 2011, 11am PDT
An independent group is seeking to "ignite essential discussions about art in Los Angeles" by getting locals to put APPROVE or DISAPPROVE stickers on public art around the city.
MOCA-latte
May 11, 2011, 9am PDT
That was David Motzenbecker's thought as he began a public meeting of the Minneapolis Planning Department, which inspired him to re-think how the city engages the public.
On The Commons
Blog post
March 19, 2011, 11pm PDT
In 2009 we worked with Ron Thomas, Mary Means, and Goody Clancy to help plan and run a large 500+ person visioning event in the town of Shreveport.  We set up the event the night before with computers at every table for brainstorming and a keypad polling system providing each participant with a handheld device for voting and prioritizing strategies in the region.  We had a tech table set up next to the audio/filming crew, a group that was very helpful in getting us what we need to set up.   We tested everything, including making sure the keypads registered in the far corners of the convention space. 

Ken Snyder
February 27, 2011, 1pm PST
NYC's Deputy Mayor of Operations Stephen Goldsmith reflects on the value of listening to people, and talks about the new crowdsourcing projects the city is rolling out.
Governing
February 14, 2011, 11am PST
Using the example of the failed regeneration of Green Bay's downtown led by Victor Gruen, Della Rucker argues that disregarding input from the public can have devastating repercussions.
New Geography
January 11, 2011, 12pm PST
NIMBYism is obstructing the urban planning process, according to architect and New Urbanist Andres Duany. He suggests changing the public participation process to unclog the system.
Architect
December 25, 2010, 9am PST
"Give a Minute" is a program that seeks ideas for fixing cities directly from the people who use them, using ads in newspapers and displays in public spaces to ask a big question, such as "What would get you to walk, bike or take transit more often?"
Urban Omnibus
December 2, 2010, 1pm PST
A simple sticker that says "I WISH THIS WAS" gives New Orleans residents a way to comment directly on their communities.
Candy Chang blog
December 1, 2010, 7am PST
Washington D.C.'s Metro is expecting a major increase in ridership over the next 30 years. To try to meet that demand, they're recruiting ideas from the public with a new outreach effort.
The City Fix
November 18, 2010, 5am PST
This post from <em>The City Fix</em> looks at various efforts to increase communication between transit riders and transit providers in Chicago.
The City Fix
November 17, 2010, 11am PST
An experiment in community participation conducted by a multinational group of architects, planners and artists in south Delhi tests the efficacy of guerrilla neighborhood planning methods in the developing world.
The Wall Street Journal
Blog post
October 31, 2010, 11am PDT
Over the last six months some of my blog entries have highlighted plans and places. This month I turn to processes that are important in planning. This is a bit trickier than plans and places as the web presence of processes tends to be dominated by project examples and how-to instructions. It’s also hard from the web to get a sense of how processes have developed over time—for example what passes as rational comprehensive planning today, complete with numerous participatory processes and evaluation strategies, is quite different from the much criticized technical model of the 1950s and 1960s. Of course that’s a good reason to go to planning school.
Ann Forsyth
October 25, 2010, 6am PDT
Looking to spur civic engagement, officials in Boulder, Colorado are experimenting with unusual incentives for attendees of city-sponsored meetings.
Daily Camera
September 22, 2010, 5am PDT
A new museum exhibit in Vermont invites visitors to review various proposals for updating the riverfront in Brattleboro -- and allows them to submit their own ideas.
Change Observer
August 18, 2010, 11am PDT
The city of Lincoln, Nebraska, is asking locals to submit and vote on ideas to integrate into its new master plan, hoping to get citizens more involved in the process and test out unconventional ideas.
Lincoln Journal Star
August 16, 2010, 2pm PDT
This piece from <em>Next American City</em> looks at a variety of urban planning-focused events being hosted by cultural institutions, and how those events help to include the regular citizen in the process of planning.
Next American City
Feature
August 16, 2010, 8am PDT
Planner Sam Gennawey details a public participation exercise he regularly uses, taken from the ideas of Christopher Alexander, that makes complex ideas simple for public understanding.
Sam Gennawey
August 15, 2010, 11am PDT
Beth Novick, author of <em>Wiki Government</em>, says that today's technology invites us to "rethink not only our democratic institutions, but our democratic theory."
WorldChanging
Blog post
July 20, 2010, 11pm PDT

The City of Los Angeles Department of Planning and Department of Transportation held a first-ever public online participation webinar Thursday, July 20, 2010. The city used the opportunity to experiment with web conferencing technology, and will survey participants after the event to evaluate the success of the experiment.

A webinar is a web conference, where participants can access a virtual meeting using a computer, and Internet connection. Participants access a website to see the presenter's computer screen, and also listen to the presenter through the computer's speakers, or using a telephone.

Chris Steins
June 16, 2010, 10am PDT
Jeremy Rosenberg of Next American City examines how the people of Los Angeles get together to watch the world cup, in the absence of any primary public meeting space.
Next American City