Reading

Blog post
June 20, 2013, 12am PDT
What should graduate students read the summer before entering planning school? For those with some time on their hands the following suggestions can help provide direction.
Ann Forsyth
Blog post
June 29, 2010, 10am PDT
I'm frequently asked for recommendations for good planning magazines. As editors of Planetizen, we come across a staggeringly impressive and diverse array of web-based content. But sometimes there is nothing quite like browsing a good magazine in y
Chris Steins
Blog post
January 4, 2010, 10am PST

With vacations upon us many students have been asking me what they should read over the winter break. Certainly it is possible to catch up with planning classics and thought-provoking books and several earlier blogs have highlighted these options. However,for those wanting to escape and learn something as well, a number of mystery authors write books that both investigate crimes and evoke a sense of place. The following list highlights just some of this range—there are hundreds more of course (and if you scroll for the bottom you will find links to other lists).

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
June 29, 2008, 2pm PDT

Lastmonth’s blog outlined how to find books recommended by many planners—important,classic, or accessible.

However,summer is also a time to push your viewpoint a bit further. For those wantingreadings that might push you tothink differently about planning, the following lists are useful startingpoints. (And a note to planners—we need more of these lists reflecting different placesand people and issues!)

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
May 28, 2008, 7am PDT

As the northern summer starts, one of the questions I am asked most frequently by current and prospective planning students is: what should I read? A number of resources are available to answer this question. This month I look at general planning readings for a North American audience but in coming months I’ll explore readings about global planning issues, planning methods, and planning classics.

For those wanting an overview of planning issues, the following lists are good places to start:

Ann Forsyth