Abandonment

Kelly Bennett writes on the connections between authentic places, abandonment, and a new wave of placemaking.
Jun 5, 2013   Citiography
In a newly announced effort, different parts of Detroit will receive different levels of public services based on projections of whether or not they're expected to grow in the future.
Jul 28, 2011   The Christian Science Monitor
California's San Joaquin Valley has become a hotbed of foreclosed homes. But beyond mere statistics, these homes are real places, and a new series of photographs documents them as scenes of surrender and abandonment.
Jul 19, 2011   Places
The wastelands of the modern world can have an almost post-apocalyptic feel. But they can also be beautiful.
Jul 17, 2011   Salon
Justin B. Hollander at Tufts University looks at the increasing shrinkage of cities like Flint, Michigan and Youngstown, Ohio and the myriad strategies these cities are taking to shrink effectively.
Apr 5, 2010   Cityscape
Thousands of homes in development are being halted and thousands more vacant new homes are being foreclosed across California, leading to crime, looting and squatting.
Mar 5, 2009   Los Angeles Times
A combination of economic crises and a tax code based on square footage rather than rentals is encouraging a raft of demolitions that is leaving parts of London looking like it's been bombed again.
Nov 26, 2008   The Globe and Mail
As foreclosures spread throughout the suburbs, subdivisions are rapidly becoming modern-day ghost towns, according to this column from <em>The Seattle Times</em>.
Oct 13, 2008   The Seattle Times
This article from <em>Developer</em> looks at five cities that are dealing creatively with their foreclosure and abandonment problems.
Aug 23, 2008   Developer
<p>Indianapolis has a growing problem with abandoned houses. To fight the blight, they're now selling the homes online.</p>
Jul 14, 2008   The Indianapolis Star
<p>This segment from <em>NPR</em> looks at the city of Cleveland and examines how foreclosures have devastated the city and many of its neighborhoods.</p>
May 27, 2008   NPR