Ciclovia

September 9, 2015, 7am PDT
In perhaps the most aggressive move in the young history of tactical urbanism, the City of Light will clear not just one street or neighborhood, but rather an entire district of cars for 'Une Journée Sans Voiture' September 27.
Forbes
March 12, 2015, 8am PDT
Aaron Paley, the man who brought Ciclovia to the United States, wants Los Angeles to be a model for the transition from auto-dependent to car-optional.
The California Sunday Magazine
October 8, 2014, 11am PDT
The improvement in air quality comes from reductions in toxic emissions from autos, trucks, and ships. Enjoying the cleaner air were tens of thousands of Angelenos riding on miles of streets closed to auto traffic for the 10th CicLAvia event.
Take Part
April 10, 2014, 7am PDT
Inspired by the ciclovías of Bogotá, Colombia, open street events are growing in popularity around the world. Here’s a survey of nine events from around the world that close streets to cars and open them up to humans.
Gizmodo
March 31, 2012, 9am PDT
Tim Gill chronicles a community-based movement to reclaim streets for play, part of a global wave of playful street-based interventions looking to change the nature of how we view our shared spaces.
Rethinking Childhood
July 9, 2010, 7am PDT
Oakland, California recently closed off two miles of city street to cars, creating a Bogota-inspired ciclovia, dubbed 'Oaklavia'.
Streetsblog
Blog post
June 11, 2010, 8pm PDT

Jay McChord is as energetic and passionate a person as you’ll find in America. While many know him as a generational communication consultant, a Lexington, Kentucky City Councilman, or even as a former University of Kentucky “Wildcat” mascot, livable streets advocates should know him as the chief architect of the only statewide ciclovia program in the United States: Kentucky’s (2S) initiative (http://www.2ndsundayky.com/index.htm).

Mike Lydon
November 5, 2009, 8am PST
A group of cyclists in Los Angeles is hoping to move forward in talks with the city to establish car-free days, based on the ciclovia street closures originated in Colombia.
Los Angeles Times
Blog post
March 11, 2009, 7pm PDT
Livable streets proponents look back on 2008 as the year some of the movement’s best laid plans became mainstream. Bicycle sharing systems launched in both Washington DC and Montreal. Auto-dependent Charlotte saw its LYNX light rail surpass 2025 ridership projections, while Seattle also beat ridership projections on its snazzy new Streetcar. And New York City and Portland continued to reclaim space for less auto-centric uses—witnessing 35% and 25% growth respectively in bicycle mode share.
Mike Lydon
January 20, 2009, 7am PST
Miami and Miami-Dade County are working together to implement a robust network of bicycle infrastructure that in tandem with ongoing events like Bike Miami Days and County led Ciclovia events,will help residents and visitors get out of their cars.
Miami Herald
Blog post
December 16, 2008, 2pm PST
In late 2007, it was with increasing frustration that I penned and op-ed entitled "Make Miami a Bicycle-Friendly City." Appearing in the December 13th edition of the Miami Herald, the article implored City officials to make the city more amenable to bicycling (It was no surprise in the spring of 2008 when Bicycling Magazine named Miami one of the three worst cities in America in which to bicycle).

The City's response exceeded all of my expectations.

Mike Lydon
September 29, 2008, 5am PDT
Once a week, car-flooded streets convert into bike- and pedestrian-flooded public parks in crowded Mexico City.
Los Angeles Times
August 18, 2008, 12pm PDT
Temporary street closures for pedestrian use -- an idea that spawned in Bogota, Colombia -- are occurring in cities all over the world. The trend is expected to continue.
The Christian Science Monitor
May 25, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom is considering a plan to temporarily close down certain streets to car traffic, creating public space for pedestrians -- similar to the successful Ciclovia that takes place weekly in Bogota, Colombia.</p>
The Examiner