Informal Settlements

In an effort to tap into new users, companies like Google and Microsoft are racing to map the winding, informal streets of Brazil's slums in Rio de Janeiro.
Sep 25, 2014   The Wall Street Journal
Evelio Contreras and Philip Kennicott film the Occupy movement transforming MacPherson Square into an urban hub, in one of Washington's central nodal points.
Nov 11, 2011   The Washington Post
A new exhibition curated by the Cooper-Hewitt in New York illustrates how the design community is trying to reshape itself as more collaborative than 'pedagogic or paternalistic.'
Oct 14, 2011   The Atlantic
Informal settlements - unregulated, makeshift housing - create substantial safety and health risks in Latin American countries. While clearing of settlements is not a solution, letting them be is not an option. Gregory K. Ingram suggests that regularizing programs combined with upgrading assistance can be effective means of improving conditions. Exclusive
Jun 20, 2011  By Gregory K. Ingram
Informal settlements like slums and favelas have been perplexing governments in Latin America for decades. A new report looks at two of the ways governments are addressing these areas, and the challenges that remain.
Jun 1, 2011   Citiwire
The population of India's slums is expected to rise close to 100 million in 2011.
Sep 16, 2010   Tiny Green Bubble
In this paper, Gustavo Rivera Jr. (Ph. D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Chicago) evaluates the economic and sociocultural impact of recently developed public housing estates within the favelas of Belo Horizonte.
Jan 18, 2010   The Urban Reinventors Online Urban Journal
Luanda, Angola has brushed past Tokyo and London to be the world's most expensive city, and slums cover much of the city's prime real estate.
Sep 10, 2008   The Globe and Mail
<p>This article from the <em>Harvard Design Magazine</em> looks at slums in Latin America and discusses the important role they play in their cities. Preserving the positive qualities of these communities is increasingly preferred over slum clearance.</p>
May 19, 2008   Harvard Design Magazine