John Norquist

Freeways are disconnected, unwalkable, and have limited access; they are the antithesis of "urban." So we should probably use a different term to describe them, argues Alex McKeag.
Sep 17, 2013   CNU.org
With Milwaukee's planned streetcar system a focus of campaign attacks by recalled governor Scott Walker on his Democratic challenger, and current mayor, Tom Barrett, Matt Dellinger asks if Walker's victory means the end of the line for the train.
Jun 13, 2012   Transportation Nation
"We should not let the lame be the enemy of the perfectly adequate," says one critic of the New Haven mayor's proposal.
May 17, 2012   Better! Cities & Towns
On the occasion of the 20th Congress for the New Urbanism, running through the weekend in West Palm Beach, Anthony Flint looks at what happens when a revolutionary movement becomes part of the establishment.
May 11, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
John Norquist is today the president of CNU, but from 1988-94 he was Mayor of Milwaukee. His legacy is apparent today in the city, says blogger Urban Engagement.
Oct 6, 2009   Urban Engagement blog
A conservative Christian reporter attended the Congress for New Urbanism this year, and found that many New Urbanists support strategies that don't fit neatly into Democratic or Republican platforms.
Jul 21, 2009   WORLD Magazine
According to a new draft master plan, the Clairborne Expressway may be the next freeway to join the nation's growing highway to boulevard movement.
Jul 13, 2009   The Times-Picayune
DOT and HUD announce a joint effort to merge land use and planning to improve livability. CNU's John Norquist comments on the merger.
May 2, 2009   New Urban News
John Norquist presents CNUs recommendations for improving the American Recovery and Reinvestment Economic Recovery Bill, including more funding for transit and smarter road building.
Jan 20, 2009   Congress for the New Urbanism
<p>Keeping land uses separate is like keeping the ingredients of pizza separate, according to Congress for New Urbanism President John Norquist. The result is an urban pie that doesn't taste as good as it could.</p>
May 16, 2008   Columbus Ledger-Enquirer