Office Parks

Owners of a 173-acre office campus in Simsbury, Connecticut are hoping that by adopting a form-based code as a guide for potential redevelopment of the site, potential buyers have more reason to pull the trigger on a deal.
Aug 10, 2014   Hartford Business Journal
Comcast recently released designs for a $1.2 billion skyscraper in Downtown Philadelphia. The building’s potential starkly contrasts the suburban model of commercial office parks.
Jan 20, 2014   Philadelphia Inquirer
As suburban office parks struggle to lure tenants not decamping for more urban environments, some are investing princely sums to renovate their buildings in the hope of capturing a slice of the shrinking pie.
May 30, 2013   The New York Times
Across America, developers and municipalities are trying to adapt a relic of the sprawling post-war suburbs for a more urbane 21st century. Can office park makeovers revive these increasingly barren landscapes?
May 23, 2013   The Wall Street Journal
In the latest article from <em>Better Cities & Towns'</em> series on healthy, walkable town centers, Geoff Dyer offers insight into the ways that locating office space in mixed-use centers can improve economic vitality.
Aug 14, 2012   Better Cities & Towns
Suburban areas were once strongholds of corporate campuses and office parks. But there's a shift underway that's drawing companies back to cities.
Jun 2, 2011   Grist
Even office parks in the exurbs can have high rates of transit use, according to success seen at an office park in San Ramon, California.
Apr 14, 2011   The Atlantic
A developer is turning the former site of the Hughes Aircraft Company--adjacent to the huge new Playa Vista mixed-use development--into an office complex catering to the technology and creative industries.
Apr 4, 2011   The Planning Report
The area's tech firms, which typically favor office parks, are increasingly drawn to revitalized urban centers, according to The Wall Street Journal.
Nov 11, 2010   The Wall Street Journal
Most attempts to regulate suburban development have focused on containing the growth of suburban housing. But such regulation, by restricting the supply of buildable land, risks incresing housing prices. And from a more libertarian perspective, an individual's interest in choosing to "drive to qualify" may seem quite appealing. Attempts to regulate commercial suburban development do not involve the same sentimental considerations as limits on residential development, but do risk increasing prices for commercial land, thus increasing prices for everything else. Opinion
Feb 3, 2010   By Michael Lewyn
Plans to build a group of villages near science and biotech office parks in Maryland could help the area secure federal light rail funding.
Oct 28, 2009   The Washington Post