Public Health

The Alliance for Biking and Walking’s 2014 Benchmarking report found a strong correlation between active commuting rates and health outcomes like diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure.
5 hours ago   Streetsblog USA
If you live in New York City, now is the time to get your super sized sodas while you still can. Due to a ban on the sale of large sugary drinks approved yesterday by the NYC Board of Health, such treats will be verboten in six months.
Sep 14, 2012   The New York Times
William Heisel kicks of a series examining the infectious disease more common than AIDS, hepatitis, or Lyme disease. What environmental elements are contributing to its spread and what can planners and public health officials do to respond?
Sep 12, 2012   Reporting on Health
Moving families from segregated, high poverty neighborhoods, into desegregated "areas of opportunity" has multiple effects. Housing mobility programs help revitalize communities and improve the physical and mental health of families involved.
Sep 6, 2012   Shelterforce Magazine
In Amanda Erickson's explanation of the history of urban planning, the profession as conceived at the start of the 20th century confronted a choice between creating beautiful people or beautiful cities. Why couldn't planners have created both?
Aug 29, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Often times, the community development field and health philanthropy have worked in the same neighborhoods, but separately. This is changing, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Marjorie Paloma told Shelterforce how.
Aug 28, 2012   Shelterforce Magazine
A new New York Times poll finds that a majority of New York City residents oppose Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s proposed ban on sugary drinks, adding fuel to the debate.
Aug 24, 2012   The New York Times
A new report out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds conflicting trends in Americans' walking habits. What's clear, however, is that an astonishing 38% of adults have not walked more than 10 minutes straight in the last week.
Aug 15, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Sixty percent of premature deaths are accounted for not by medical care or lack thereof, but by social circumstances, environmental conditions, and behavioral patterns. So perhaps the medical field on its own can't prevent them.
Aug 2, 2012   Shelterforce
Likely of little surprise to anyone who's found themselves among the few pedestrians not gazing down at a cell phone on a busy urban street, 'distracted walking' is fast becoming a major public health hazard across the U.S., reports Deborah Netburn.
Jul 31, 2012   Los Angeles Times
A June panel, ‘Experiencing Healthier Places’, at the AIA Design Conference in LA looked at the roles that professional planners and architects can have in fostering a healthier society through the built environment.
Jul 6, 2012   The Planning Report