Public Health

April 10, 2015, 10am PDT
Research suggests a correlation between regional income inequality and poorer health. Several statistical and sociological causes may come into play.
New York Times
Feature
April 8, 2015, 8am PDT
Expanding on earlier research about the impacts of one-way streets on outcomes such as public health and property values, a new study examines a citywide case study in Louisville.
John Gilderbloom and William Riggs
March 20, 2015, 8am PDT
Public health analysts and justice activists are tackling food deserts in a state known for its agricultural output. Low-income neighborhoods of color are the hardest hit by a lack of grocery options.
Pacific Standard
March 19, 2015, 12pm PDT
A fast food ban enacted in 2008 in an effort to curb obesity, diabetes, and other chronic health issues failed to achieve its well-intentioned goals, according to a new study by the RAND Corporation.
RAND
March 18, 2015, 5am PDT
The elderly population in cities is growing, and research points to the health benefits of an active, connected lifestyle. So why are cities still so inhospitable to aging?
The Guardian
March 14, 2015, 9am PDT
The county of Santa Clara is exploring the possibility of establishing an Urban Agriculture Incentive Zone—a relatively new land use incentive enabled by recent statewide legislation.
Seedstock
March 9, 2015, 7am PDT
Too often we report on new studies showing how air pollution worsens public health, often causing premature death. For a change, here's a study showing how efforts to improve air quality in Southern California have boosted public health in children.
The Wall Street Journal
March 2, 2015, 8am PST
The Urban Land Institute just rolled out How Housing Matters, an online portal for news, research, infographics, and multimedia examining how housing affects community health.
Architect Magazine
February 21, 2015, 7am PST
Responding to the New York train crash that killed six this month, Sam Tanenhaus reflects on how commuting got so dangerous and why we don't demand better.
The New Yorker
February 19, 2015, 11am PST
It wouldn't exactly mean cats and dogs living together, but what if technological innovations could make cars safer for pedestrians and bikers?
The Washington Post
February 6, 2015, 2pm PST
Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have spent the last 18 months scouring the New York Subway in the search for a DNA profile of the system. They even created a map of the 15,152 microbes they found.
Science Daily
January 29, 2015, 11am PST
Bike advocates will be pleased with the talk coming from the direction of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx.
Streetsblog USA
January 7, 2015, 8am PST
The Trust for Public Land’s Center for City Park Excellence released a report placing the value of San Francisco's park system at $959 million.
City Parks Blog
January 1, 2015, 1pm PST
Do bike helmet laws prevent injuries for children, or do they just discourage children from riding bikes?
The Incidental Economist
Feature
December 31, 2014, 5am PST
A deeper look at the traffic data on Planetizen reveals trends from the planning and urban design conversation of 2014.
James Brasuell
December 30, 2014, 5am PST
Never mind that the lines are needed to carry renewable energy from wind turbines in the north to industries in the south to meet the nation's formidable carbon reduction policies. Public health and property values come first for some neighbors.
The New York Times
Blog post
December 15, 2014, 5am PST
Only by better addressing issues of inequity can we create truly sustainable and livable communities. But is that even possible today?
Mark Hough
November 29, 2014, 1pm PST
Researchers continue to verify the health benefits of walkable neighborhoods. Most recently researchers at Kansas University found benefits that communities can use to ensure the quality of life of aging residents.
Kansas University
November 28, 2014, 7am PST
Toronto will begin rolling out a program to narrow traffic lanes on the city's streets. The new lane policy, recently completed, was in the works for the past year.
The Globe and Mail
October 30, 2014, 11am PDT
The "Using Behavioral Economics to Create Playable Cities" report suggests that so much time spent in front of screens, and the continued need to counter the obesity epidemic, requires new thinking about play for children living in cities.
Next City