Economic Opportunity

January 2, 2016, 1pm PST
Eight Chicago universities have agreed to engage with the city and local communities as they invest in their neighborhoods. The hope is to increase opportunities for employment and economic growth.
Urban Institute
Blog post
December 8, 2015, 5am PST
Smart Growth critic Wendell Cox recently endorsed White House Economic Advisor Jason Furman's criticisms of zoning codes that limit infill development, essentially endorsing Smart Growth policy reforms.
Todd Litman
Blog post
August 20, 2015, 2pm PDT
The Center for Opportunity Urbanism has a wonderful goal—to improve economic opportunities for working class households—but uses terrible research to reach confusing recommendations about which policies are best. Please do better!
Todd Litman
March 28, 2015, 1pm PDT
According to Brookings, this research is intended to inform local debates over the minimum wage. Drawing on Census data, the report finds that astronomical income gains are still concentrated among the biggest cities.
Brookings Institution
November 18, 2014, 7am PST
A new blog post from Jonathan Rothwell discusses the impact of neighborhoods on upward mobility.
Brookings Institution
October 27, 2014, 11am PDT
Recent data shows that workers need cars to access jobs and economic opportunity. What can planners do to expand access to jobs via other alternative modes of transportation?
Brookings: The Avenue
October 24, 2014, 9am PDT
The skills and location data of over 175 million LinkedIn members were mined to produce a map displaying the industries most common in major cities throughout the United States and Europe.
LinkedIn Blog
August 21, 2014, 10am PDT
Richard Reeves explains the factors that limit or assist social mobility for people born into the lowest economic quintile in American society.
Brookings Institution
Blog post
July 26, 2012, 11am PDT

A recent paper by Harvard economists Daniel Shoag and Peter Ganong titled, Why Has Regional Convergence in the U.S. Stopped? indicates that land development regulations tend to increase housing costs, which contributes to inequality by excluding lower-income households from more economically productive urban regions. Does this means that planners are guilty of increasing income inequality?

Todd Litman
Blog post
January 17, 2011, 10pm PST

I spent last week at the Asian Development Bank (ADB) headquarters in Manila, in the Philippines, where we are starting on an exciting but humbling project: developing a more comprehensive framework for transport project evaluation. Among other factors, this project will develop better methods for incorporating social equity impacts into transport planning. This is important in any community, and particularly in developing countries where many people are extremely poor. What transport policies and planning practices respond to their needs?

Todd Litman