February 25, 2016, 9am PST
Unlike Europe where renewable energy is heavily subsidized, very few biogas projects that convert farm waste to energy using anaerobic digesters are being built in the U.S. State incentives are instrumental due to high capital and maintenance costs.
The Wall Street Journal - Business
December 21, 2015, 1pm PST
With transportation the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in California, San Mateo will be the first city to reduce emissions by using biogas produced at its wastewater treatment plant for use in city vehicles.
San Mateo Daily Journal
October 10, 2015, 5am PDT
No, the title does not refer to Congress, it is meant to be taken literally: It is about the District of Columbia's sewage treatment plant that produces renewable energy by treating its biosolids with a new hydrolysis technology imported from Norway.
The Washington Post
August 4, 2014, 5am PDT
Thinking about "renewable power" often bring hydroelectric, wind, and solar to mind. The informed will recognize geothermal and biomass as major renewables. Biogas, the non-fossil natural gas, is not well known because few facilities capture it.
EPA Blog
July 2, 2014, 10am PDT
A key regulation in California's war on global warming emissions withstood a major court challenge by the energy industry—both oil and corn ethanol—when the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear their challenge to an Appeals Court ruling on June 30.
San Francisco Chronicle
March 14, 2014, 10am PDT
Yes, one is with and the other without oxygen, and both divert waste from the landfill—but in terms of the end products, what is the advantage of anaerobic digestion? Simply put, does society face a shortage of compost or renewable energy?
NPR Morning Edition
October 30, 2011, 1pm PDT
Wedged into a report about the merits of various alternative fuels for port activities is a recent report from the American Chemical Society stating that alligator fat may be a great alternative to soy-based biogas.
January 21, 2011, 8am PST
Banned for its combination of caffeine and alcohol, the makers of Four Loko were faced with a problem: what to do with their leftover stocks. A Virginia company is recycling the controversial hootch into ethanol for cars.
Popular Science
November 29, 2010, 6am PST
A proposal for a skyscraper that grows biodiesel-emitting algae took 2nd place in a competition to design the 300m tall Taiwan Tower in Taichung.
August 5, 2009, 9am PDT
The City of San Jose, California is on its way to becoming the nation's first energy-independent city, deriving all of its energy from renewable sources.
USA Today
May 11, 2009, 8am PDT
A new study by researchers at the University of California, Merced suggests that using biomass to create electricity to power cars could be more efficient than using the same biomass to create ethanol to power cars.
UC Merced
March 12, 2009, 7am PDT
Treehugger recently heralded fuel-producing algae the hottest green technology going. GOOD Magazine takes a clear-eyed look at the promise and the pitfalls.
GOOD Magazine
February 5, 2009, 6am PST
Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. is working with startup E-Fuel to create gas from their brewing yeast waste.
September 15, 2008, 5am PDT
A committee in the European Parliament endorsed a plan that calls for 10% of transportation fuels to come from sources such as plants and grains by 2020, but it also calls for a switch to other renewable sources over time.
The New York Times
July 21, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>Later this summer residents in the Province of Ontario will be able to plug in their homes to a new source of electrical power: biogas derived from cow manure.</p>
The Globe & Mail
May 30, 2008, 6am PDT
<p>Household sewage is currently fueling cars in Sweden, and has for years. But Swedish industry has given up on the idea, investing in ethanol-based gasoline.</p>
International Herald Tribune
May 7, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>In an incredible recycling operation that reduces global warming, a waste hauler is building a facility to produce Liquefied Natural Gas from methane emitted from its California landfill to fuel its garbage trucks.</p>
The Sacramento Bee