Urban Heat Island

April 25, 2016, 2pm PDT
Louisville has the ignominious distinction of having the largest heat island effect of any of the largest cities in the United States. A new study from the Urban Climate Lab at Georgia Tech suggests ideas for lowering the heat in the city.
The Courier-Journal
February 1, 2016, 12pm PST
Louisville, Kentucky has recently been named the "most rapidly growing urban heat island" in the U.S., but what led to this title? Jeff Byles traces how cities are becoming increasingly warm through a number of different factors, including economic.
Doggerel
September 24, 2015, 12pm PDT
No, this is not a trick question. By definition, you'd think the answer is L.A., where the heat is generated, but it's actually San Bernardino, 56 miles to the east. Turns out that like ozone, heat is transported by the wind.
KPCC
August 2, 2015, 1pm PDT
Yet another climate change side effect: more frequent urban heat waves. And because urban temperatures tend higher than rural ones, cities should be ready to protect the most vulnerable.
The Nature Conservancy - Cool Green Science
August 9, 2014, 11am PDT
An article by Steven Snell summarizes the drawbacks of building vertical cities.
Fast Forward Weekly
August 1, 2014, 11am PDT
An overview of how Los Angeles County’s Department of Parks and Recreation is creating projects that tackle the effects of climate change, by planner Clement Lau.
UrbDeZine
July 23, 2014, 9am PDT
A study investigates the effect of air conditioning systems on air temperature and electricity demand. The study's findings: the release of waste heat (via AC systems) exacerbates the nocturnal urban heat island, thus increasing cooling demands.
Treehugger
August 14, 2013, 1pm PDT
A new report by state scientists identifies three dozen environmental indicators that confirm the effects of climate change on California are ‘significant and growing.’
Los Angeles Times
October 5, 2012, 9am PDT
Chicago's backyards may turn into oases of sustainability with a new program aimed at creating incentives for 'greener' practices in the city's private gardens.
Switchboard
October 4, 2012, 6am PDT
Study suggests that light-colored roofs may reduce regional rainfall.
Climatewire
September 12, 2012, 5am PDT
Cities consistently experience higher temperatures than the surrounding countryside due to the 'heat island' effect. With global warming exacerbating these effects, cities are trying to lower local contributors to urban heat.
NPR
September 8, 2012, 11am PDT
With the number of days of 'extreme heat' on the rise, and dramatic increases projected, will global warming melt the Golden State?
Grist
April 11, 2012, 6am PDT
Ben Welle discusses the benefits of freeway removal programs both at home and abroad, and explores what cities have done to fill the void they leave behind.
The City Fix
November 3, 2011, 10am PDT
A recent study published by researchers at Stanford University shows how the heat island effect has little bearing on global warming and how painting roofs white actually may increase temperatures, writes David Malakoff for The Guardian.
The Guardian
July 9, 2009, 8am PDT
As oil prices rise, so does the cost of asphalt. Concrete, historically more expensive, is now becoming a viable cost competitor. Because of its lighter shade, its also been shown to contribute less to climate change.
The Infrastructurist
May 20, 2009, 6am PDT
White roofs have gained cachet as a solution to the urban heat island effect. But in places where there are more cold days than hot, a white roof that reflects warming sunlight might not make the best sense, according to this piece.
Miller-McCune
January 28, 2009, 2pm PST
Fighting global warming could be as simple as a paint job -- a global, sun-reflecting, white-wash paint job, according to scientist Hashem Akbari.
Guardian
May 1, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>In the current issue of Housing Policy Debate, Reid Ewing and Fang Rong argue that sprawling urban form contributes to higher residential energy use. Two responses -- one from Samuel Staley and another by John Randolph -- rebut the paper.</p>
Housing Policy Debate