Segregation

October 25, 2016, 10am PDT
Call it the re-education, the evolution, or the contrition of Richard Florida, but the "rock-star urbanist" has realized some unintended consequences of his creative class ethos, and he's ready to share a new vision for cities.
Houston Chronicle
October 15, 2016, 5am PDT
Jason Hackworth argues that demolition has come to be seen as a good, in and of itself, in rust belt cities like Detroit; giving rise to policies that are wrong-headed and dangerous.
London School of Economics and Political Science - American Politics and Policy Blog
October 6, 2016, 9am PDT
Commentators relentlessly debate whether Donald Trump's support hinges on economics or race. Alexis C. Madrigal discusses how the two are joined at the hip, especially in real estate.
Fusion
July 7, 2016, 2pm PDT
According to Seymour Toll's 1969 book, New York City's 1916 zoning code was less a civic-minded project than an attempt to protect elite retail districts from the riff-raff. The ramifications for American zoning at large are significant.
PlanPhilly
May 8, 2016, 7am PDT
The Sightline Institute tackles what may be "our most acute urban public policy challenge."
Sightline Institute
January 29, 2016, 12pm PST
A new book published by the Pew Research Center details the demographic changes that will shape the politics—beyond presidential elections—of the future.
Pew Research Center
January 5, 2016, 1pm PST
A new study reveals new understanding about how restrictive land use regulations in urban areas affect economic segregation across metropolitan areas.
CityLab
December 12, 2015, 1pm PST
It's too soon to declare the beginning of the end for segregation, but one demographer is hopeful that there are opportunities to better integrate different racial groups.
Brookings
October 29, 2015, 5am PDT
Drawing on a distinction between equality and equity, Rick Jacobus argues that so-called 'poor doors' are a necessary compromise to promote affordable housing and neighborhood integration.
Rooflines
August 24, 2015, 6am PDT
Voucher recipients live in slightly better neighborhoods than the average poor household, but they still live in economically and racially segregated neighborhoods with poor-performing schools.
Brookings Institute
July 28, 2015, 11am PDT
An analysis and accompanying interactive map from the Urban Institute show where the nation's richest and poorest tend to live. The map tells a tale of deeply ingrained wealth segregation.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
June 22, 2015, 12pm PDT
Many places are statistically diverse, but their inhabits can be worlds apart. A local perspective (and finer data) is needed to fully appreciate how different races and classes inhabit a neighborhood.
Rice Kinder Institute for Urban Research
June 10, 2015, 2pm PDT
Exploring the persistence of racial segregation as a result of U.S. housing policies—policies intended to break patterns of segregation, not reproduce them.
The Atlantic
May 18, 2015, 7am PDT
Statistics sage Nate Silver crunches the numbers illustrating the relationship between U.S. cities' overall diversity and their neighborhood diversity. His conclusion: the greater diversity, the greater the segregation.
FiveThirtyEight
April 28, 2015, 8am PDT
Although income inequality receives plenty of coverage these days, research suggests that neighborhoods of color have less access to resources than white neighborhoods despite similar median incomes.
Next City
March 7, 2015, 7am PST
A new study by researchers at the University of Minnesota identifies the consequences of Twin Cities affordable housing policy: deepening racial and economic segregation.
MinnPost
September 29, 2014, 1pm PDT
New analysis from Richard Florida and the Martin Prosperity Institute maps segregation by employment type, finding the darker effects of the creative class.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
August 15, 2014, 12pm PDT
Grosse Point Park, which borders Detroit, has blocked streets that connect its commercial district from the east side of Detroit. An editorial from the Detroit News says that the focus should be on making Detroit a better neighbor.
The Detroit News
July 23, 2014, 5am PDT
Extell Development Company made news last summer by proposing a luxury development with a separate entrance for below-market-rate units. Now that the project is fully approved, New York councilmembers might expand anti-discrimination policies.
Think Progress
July 13, 2014, 5am PDT
The ugly story of the fence between a public housing community called New Haven and the nearby "middle class" community of Hamden, Connecticut will soon be over, but not because Hamden suddenly gained enlightenment.
New York Times