Census Data

In a pattern evident in communities all over the country, U.S. Census data shows more Americans are working from home. Researchers from the Brookings Institution are hoping that planners have noticed the trend.
6 days ago   Brookings Institution
While the Census Bureau reported impressive findings on the reduction of Americans without health insurance last year, there was nothing impressive in the numbers on income and poverty, notwithstanding an increase in employment.
Sep 19, 2015   The New York Times
If the goal of the Affordable Care Act is to reduce the percentage of Americans without health insurance, new Census data shows it's doing just that. Americans without health insurance fell by three percent last year, or 8.8 million people.
Sep 18, 2015   Slate
When it comes to the Census, the term "alternative transportation" makes perfect sense. Eric Jaffe looks at the 15 metropolitan areas with the lowest auto commuting and describes the most popular alternatives.
Aug 21, 2015   CityLab
Proof from the Census Bureau's latest American Community Survey on commuting by auto shows that millennials, if they live in cities, do indeed drive less. Census researcher Brian McKenzie describes the finding in the bureau's blog, Random Samplings.
Aug 18, 2015   Random Samplings
According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey on commuting to work, one subregion in the Bay Area can claim accolades for having achieved the largest drop in solo-commuting from 2006, scoring the third lowest drive-alone rate in 2013.
Aug 17, 2015   The Sacramento Bee - Capitol Alert
A new Harvard Business School report lays the economic and equity case for fracking—through direct and indirect job creation, America's middle class is reaping substantial wage gains and reduced energy costs. Renewables are also discussed.
Jun 12, 2015   NPR Morning Edition
Although city growth continues to outpace the suburbs, the nation's three largest cities are experiencing a growth slowdown. Sunbelt cities like Austin and Orlando are picking up the slack.
Jun 6, 2015   Brookings
Census Bureau data indicates that the shift to Sun Belt suburbs is still the majority preference. Turns out warmth, jobs, and affordable housing are a powerful triumvirate.
Apr 28, 2015   The New York Times
For a variety of economic reasons in addition to urban preferences, young people are not leaving the country's three major metropolitan areas: New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago, and that's not good for the nation's economy nor the individuals.
Jan 23, 2015   The Wall Street Journal
Same story, different year, though more data provided on which groups are leaving the Golden State: predominantly workers earning less than $50,000 a year. Conversely, those migrating to California from other states had higher incomes and education.
Jan 7, 2015   Los Angeles Times