Census Data

June 24, 2016, 7am PDT
The in-migration of Millennials is largely driving the changes that American cities are going through. More specifically, it is the ones with college degrees who are driving the change. Where are they moving, and what is their effect?
Shelterforce/Rooflines
June 9, 2016, 10am PDT
NextCity surveys a variety of new data-collecting technologies meant to clarify the impacts of bike and pedestrian infrastructure projects.
Next City
May 23, 2016, 11am PDT
Middle class African-Americans are fleeing Chicago due to crime, not due to being priced out, as is common elsewhere. "On average more than 10,000 African-Americans leave the city every," reports Brandis Friedman of WTTW for the PBS NewsHour.
PBS NewsHour
May 23, 2016, 8am PDT
Rail has transformed the Mile-High City, and the new University of Colorado A Line from Union Station to the airport is but one of many lines that has turned Denver one of the nation's fastest growing and attractive cities. And more lines are coming!
Politico Magazine
May 5, 2016, 10am PDT
Why are folks fleeing from the city and the state in record numbers? Is domestic migration to blame for the Chicago region's population loss last year of over 6,000 and the state's loss of over 22,000 people?
Chicago Tribune
March 24, 2016, 11am PDT
No one is denying that many Americans endure long, arduous commutes. But the data does not verify reports that "mega-commutes" are on the rise.
City Observatory
March 4, 2016, 11am PST
According to an analysis by the data research team at Trulia, renters have shorter commutes in 43 of 50 major metros. But despite there being more renters, commutes are still getting longer.
Trulia
March 2, 2016, 12pm PST
The collective amount of time Americans spend commuting is staggering, and it's only growing.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
December 29, 2015, 9am PST
New Census data provides a contemporary view of domestic migration, which has returned to pre-recession patterns.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
December 20, 2015, 1pm PST
Washington, D.C. provides a model for trends found in other cities: people living near transit are trending younger, whiter, and more educated.
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
December 8, 2015, 7am PST
Gentrification is happening faster than our ability to track it via census data. What is rental data telling us now?
Shelterforce/Rooflines
September 29, 2015, 11am PDT
In a pattern evident in communities all over the country, U.S. Census data shows more Americans are working from home. Researchers from the Brookings Institution are hoping that planners have noticed the trend.
Brookings Institution
September 19, 2015, 5am PDT
While the Census Bureau reported impressive findings on the reduction of Americans without health insurance last year, there was nothing impressive in the numbers on income and poverty, notwithstanding an increase in employment.
The New York Times
September 18, 2015, 2pm PDT
If the goal of the Affordable Care Act is to reduce the percentage of Americans without health insurance, new Census data shows it's doing just that. Americans without health insurance fell by three percent last year, or 8.8 million people.
Slate
August 21, 2015, 2pm PDT
When it comes to the Census, the term "alternative transportation" makes perfect sense. Eric Jaffe looks at the 15 metropolitan areas with the lowest auto commuting and describes the most popular alternatives.
CityLab
August 18, 2015, 7am PDT
Proof from the Census Bureau's latest American Community Survey on commuting by auto shows that millennials, if they live in cities, do indeed drive less. Census researcher Brian McKenzie describes the finding in the bureau's blog, Random Samplings.
Random Samplings
August 17, 2015, 6am PDT
According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey on commuting to work, one subregion in the Bay Area can claim accolades for having achieved the largest drop in solo-commuting from 2006, scoring the third lowest drive-alone rate in 2013.
The Sacramento Bee - Capitol Alert
June 12, 2015, 9am PDT
A new Harvard Business School report lays the economic and equity case for fracking—through direct and indirect job creation, America's middle class is reaping substantial wage gains and reduced energy costs. Renewables are also discussed.
NPR Morning Edition
June 6, 2015, 7am PDT
Although city growth continues to outpace the suburbs, the nation's three largest cities are experiencing a growth slowdown. Sunbelt cities like Austin and Orlando are picking up the slack.
Brookings
April 28, 2015, 9am PDT
Census Bureau data indicates that the shift to Sun Belt suburbs is still the majority preference. Turns out warmth, jobs, and affordable housing are a powerful triumvirate.
The New York Times