Driving

June 17, 2016, 11am PDT
Momentum Mag picks up the news of a study out of Harvard University that will produce more than one double take.
Momentum Magazine
May 31, 2016, 6am PDT
On average, women spend longer in traffic than men—perhaps because of the gendered division of labor that still exists in many households.
Pacific Standard
May 30, 2016, 9am PDT
Yes, gas prices are both lowest and highest. When compared to past Memorial Day weekends, it's the lowest since 2005, and by no coincidence the highest amount of travelers will take to the roads since the same year. Guess what that is doing to VMT?
Daily Fuel Gauge Report (AAA)
April 30, 2016, 11am PDT
City Observatory digs into the history of a Chicago suburb to answer the question: "Why don't people who say they'd like to take transit actually do it?"
City Observatory
February 20, 2016, 11am PST
A new report from the AAA indicates that American motorists encounter damage from potholes three times a year, with each incident costing an average $300 to repair. Middle and working class drivers feel the pinch disproportionately.
AAA
February 14, 2016, 7am PST
It's not just millennials anymore. A new study finds more people are going without driver's licenses than in previous decades.
NPR
January 13, 2016, 8am PST
A new study presented at the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting builds a strong case that parking causes driving.
CityLab
August 26, 2015, 6am PDT
Americans are driving more, again. Streetsblog dares to challenges the Federal Highway Administration on whether that's data worth celebrating.
Streetsblog USA
March 15, 2015, 9am PDT
Few of us are fully immune from the effects of road rage. Psychologists are asking why driving can provoke changes in behavior—and how to avert them.
Pacific Standard
January 20, 2015, 1pm PST
Florida's automobile transportation system fails a lot of tests. The latest is a study by WalletHub that ranks the financial risk of driving in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Broward Palm Beach New Times
November 21, 2014, 12pm PST
In a column for Fast Forward Weekly, Steven Snell explores the complexities in lessening the domestication of the automobile and its perceived necessity in our day-to-day lives.
Fast Forward Weekly
June 20, 2014, 8am PDT
A finance website called nerdwallet took it upon itself to rank the "worst" cities to drive a car.
nerdwallet
March 8, 2014, 5am PST
Baltimore Magazine’s annual “Best Places to Work” list factors in in salaries, benefits, and workplace perks—but not commuting. In the Washington, DC metro area, that’s no small thing.
Comeback City
Blog post
December 31, 2013, 9am PST
The cost of intown housing makes suburbia fiscally tempting- but this is in part the result of deliberate policy choices by government.
Michael Lewyn
October 26, 2013, 11am PDT
On these pages we usually tout the developed world's decline in driving and car ownership. But in Saudi Arabia, where women are not allowed to drive, the automobile serves as a vehicle for improving human rights.
The New York Times
February 28, 2013, 5am PST
Eric Jaffe reports on research that may give pause to light rail advocates who argue the mode can reduce congestion: ridership gains along new lines may come at the expense of buses, rather than cars.
The Atlantic Cities
November 7, 2012, 6am PST
Economist Joe Cortright doesn't seem to think so. According to his findings, Americans are driving less, with Millennials leading the way, and this unprecedented trend is here to stay.
D.C. Streetsblog
June 1, 2012, 8am PDT
In the face of New York City's increasing assault on automobiles, Justin Davidson stands up for the pleasures and utility of driving as a key ingredient in the city's multimodal mix of mobility.
New York Magazine
Blog post
May 17, 2012, 9pm PDT

I occasionally have speculated that our aging society would lead to increased transit ridership, as seniors lost the ability to drive. But I recently discovered that seniors are actually less likely to use public transit than the general public. One study by the American Public Transit Association showed that 6.7% of transit riders are over 65 (as opposed to 12.4% of all Americans).(1) The oldest Americans are even more underrepresented on America's buses and trains: only 1.5% of transit riders are over 80, about half their share of the population (2). The only other age group that is underrepresented on public transit is Americans under 18.

Michael Lewyn
May 9, 2012, 9am PDT
Nate Berg uncovers yet another study matching long commutes to poor health, from low fitness to high blood pressure.
The Atlantic Cities