Driving

Baltimore Magazine’s annual “Best Places to Work” list factors in in salaries, benefits, and workplace perks—but not commuting. In the Washington, DC metro area, that’s no small thing.
Mar 8, 2014   Comeback City
Recently, I was meditating about the relationship between affordable housing and sprawl.  It could be argued that auto-oriented sprawl, by opening up cheap suburban land for development, increases the housing supply and thus reduces housing costs.  Under current conditions, this theory seems to c Opinion
Dec 31, 2013   By Michael Lewyn
On these pages we usually tout the developed world's decline in driving and car ownership. But in Saudi Arabia, where women are not allowed to drive, the automobile serves as a vehicle for improving human rights.
Oct 26, 2013   The New York Times
Eric Jaffe reports on research that may give pause to light rail advocates who argue the mode can reduce congestion: ridership gains along new lines may come at the expense of buses, rather than cars.
Feb 28, 2013   The Atlantic Cities
Economist Joe Cortright doesn't seem to think so. According to his findings, Americans are driving less, with Millennials leading the way, and this unprecedented trend is here to stay.
Nov 7, 2012   D.C. Streetsblog
In the face of New York City's increasing assault on automobiles, Justin Davidson stands up for the pleasures and utility of driving as a key ingredient in the city's multimodal mix of mobility.
Jun 1, 2012   New York Magazine
I occasionally have speculated that our aging society would lead to increased transit ridership, as seniors lost the ability to drive. But I recently discovered that seniors are actually less likely to use public transit than the general public. One study by the American Public Transit Association showed that 6.7% of transit riders are over 65 (as opposed to 12.4% of all Americans).(1) The oldest Americans are even more underrepresented on America's buses and trains: only 1.5% of transit riders are over 80, about half their share of the population (2). Opinion
May 17, 2012   By Michael Lewyn
Nate Berg uncovers yet another study matching long commutes to poor health, from low fitness to high blood pressure.
May 9, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
Suburban areas don't necessarily equate with car-dependence, according to some New Urbanist plans for far-out areas. But convincing residents to opt for transit can be a challenge.
Aug 19, 2011   Scientific American
Driving is down in the U.S. and countries all over the world, according to a variety of studies. This piece from <em>New Scientist</em> looks into why the road is less traveled.
Aug 18, 2011   New Scientist
Transportation is increasingly a major civil rights issue, according to The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, which argues that federal funding disproportionally serves car drivers.
Jul 29, 2011   Wired