Sprawl

Touted as a solution to mindless suburban expansion, the vast green belts around U.K. cities create new challenges. Among them: less affordable housing, longer commutes, and dubious environmental benefits. What happens if these spaces get developed?
2 days ago   The Guardian
My column last week, How Not To Measure Housing Affordability, summarized some findings from Smart Growth America’s new report, Opinion
Apr 21, 2014   By Todd Litman
The American Lung Association is making an “urban planning push” in three San Joaquin Valley counties, according to a recent article in Associations Now. The idea behind the efforts to reduce public health risks: promote walkable communities.
Apr 17, 2014   Associations Now
A self-identified conservative who supports the “broader vision of smart growth” has identified a reason why more conservatives don’t support smart growth: the political economy of sprawl.
Apr 17, 2014   Bacon's Rebellion
A recent article details the rapid growth, evaporating surface storage capacity, and manicured lawns worsening drought conditions in Texas (no, not California).
Apr 14, 2014   Next City
In a recent blog, Focusing on People, Not Sprawl, Wendell Cox argues that smart growth policies lead to housing inaffordability. Opinion
Apr 14, 2014   By Todd Litman
A new study that examines the contributing and enabling factors that led to high foreclosure rates, neighborhood decline, and disparate impacts on low-income populations in the subdivision of Windy Ridge, near Charlotte, North Carolina.
Apr 14, 2014   Applied Geography
Smart Growth America has released the "Measuring Sprawl 2014" report, which updates the 2002 report "Measuring Sprawl and Its Impact."
Apr 2, 2014   Smart Growth America
Despite its mostly sprawling conditions, San Jose has recently prioritized walkable, dense urban environments. But should the city focus its development downtown or build a connected network of urban neighborhoods?
Mar 24, 2014   Silicon Valley Business Journal
SPUR states its case clearly by announcing, “We believe cities are the key to our future” at the opening of a new report called “SPUR’s Agenda for Change.”
Mar 13, 2014   Next City
The negative effects of a long commute have been well documented: obesity, loneliness, physical pain, marital trouble, stress and its related health problems, insomnia,  Opinion
Feb 14, 2014   By Shane Phillips