Sprawl

The general principle is simple: more density equals lower prices and less environmental impact. But suburbia's imprint is deep, both on cities themselves and on how we expect to inhabit them.
2 days ago   Grist
Commentators often say an influx of wealth is transforming American cities. But if prosperity is really still suburban, what are the consequences for the environment?
Mar 19, 2015   Grist
The American Institute of Architects will visit Atlanta this year, a month after the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War. What should we know about the city as it exists today?
Mar 18, 2015   Architect
In an interview, architect Renzo Piano says European suburbs are not desolate. He argues they shouldn't be treated as such in the quest for cohesive cities.
Mar 12, 2015   WNYC
According to a Denver Post article, the Denver metropolitan area has 31,000 homes in the development pipeline. All but 2,600 of those homes would be built in suburban counties surrounding Denver.
Mar 12, 2015   Denver Post
The environmental think tank environmental Sustainable Prosperity has created a handy infographic describing the benefits of dense urban development compared to sprawl.
Mar 6, 2015   Streetsblog USA
A post on the Lexington Streetsweeper blog examines the idea of Farming Community Subdivision, or "agrihood," and the plausibility of such a community being created in Central Kentucky.
Mar 6, 2015   The Lexington Streetsweeper
Exclusive
"Zoned in the USA: The Origins and Implications of American Land-Use Regulation," by Sonja Hirt, describes the exceptional characteristics, compared to European land use regulations, that make U.S. zoning laws so conducive to sprawl. Exclusive
Mar 4, 2015  By Josh Stephens
Blog Post
In a recent article in the Columbia Journal of Environmental Law, law student Paige Pavone critic Blog Post
Feb 19, 2015   By Michael Lewyn
Blog Post
Wendell Cox and Hugh Pavletich just released the 11th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey (IHAS). Blog Post
Jan 22, 2015   By Todd Litman
If we remove our ideological blinders, we might notice that the traditional city serves the interests of both the Left and the Right. Common ground, literally and figuratively. Ben Brown explores.
Jan 12, 2015   PlaceShakers