Sprawl

A new study, "The Southern Megalopolis: Using the Past to Predict the Future of Urban Sprawl in the Southeast U.S." predicts urban sprawl and warns of its possible consequences over the next 50 years.
Yesterday   CityLab
CEOs for Cities recently published a blistering criticism of The Texas Transportation Institute's "Urban Mobility Report", saying that the way they measure mobility helps justify sprawl. Norman W. Garrick says CEOs for Cities doesn't go far enough. Exclusive
Oct 11, 2010  By Norman Garrick
In the face of a recent report showing that sprawl was rapidly eating up developable land in New Jersey, developers have begun to ditch the McMansion in favor of taller and more dense projects.
Oct 11, 2010   The New York Times
CNN's Richard Quest takes an incredulous look at the changes brewing in Los Angeles as downtown revitalizes and the city densifies.
Oct 10, 2010   CNN
A new report suggests that making policies in Canada to avoid urban sprawl development will reduce pollution and boost the economy.
Oct 6, 2010   The Vancouver Sun
We've been measuring traffic congestion all wrong, a new report shows, and that's been making more highways look like the solution to long commutes. They're not.
Oct 3, 2010   Streetsblog
Sprawl affects the length of commutes, according to a new study from CEOs for Cities. <em>GOOD</em> visualizes the data with this infographic.
Oct 1, 2010   Good
Analysis indicates that compact development reduces the time urban residents spent in traffic and requires less spending on highways.
Sep 30, 2010   Driven Apart: How Sprawl Is Lengthening Our Commutes and Why Misleading Mobility Measures Are Making Things Worse
Habitat fragmentation linked with urban sprawl and development has been shown to negatively impact biological diversity in animals, according to new research.
Sep 27, 2010   San Diego Union Tribune
Writing in <em>The New York Times</em>, Geoff Manaugh looks at Christoph Gielen's aerial photography of urban development and sprawl.
Sep 20, 2010   The New York Times
This commentary from church architect Randy Bright argues that New Urbanists unfairly attack church sprawl, and that the cost of developing denser communities is the freedom of the people.
Sep 17, 2010   The Tulsa Beacon