A pair of articles details two new, massive greenfield developments on the way in North Texas.
5 days ago   The Dallas Morning News
David Steel explains how Buffalo's zoning code not only makes it impossible to build the type of neighborhoods people love, but also guarantees that low density development pays less taxes.
Jun 29, 2012   Rust Wire
In an opinion piece for The New York Times, Allison Arieff considers the next phase of the "American Dream," as the notion of trading in the ideal of the home as fortress for the home as part of a larger whole gains widespread traction.
Jun 19, 2012   The New York Times
A new report from the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies released this week claims that sprawl is poised to make a comeback after a pause driven by the recession, and not lasting changes in lifestyle choice, reports Robbie Whelan.
Jun 15, 2012   The Wall Street Journal
Mark Byrnes brings us a fascinating, and regrettably short, clip of Frank Lloyd Wright discussing his opinions of the city, the skyscraper, and why "the best people" are leaving New York.
Jun 11, 2012   The Atlantic Cities
An important new study published by the Arizona Department of Transportation indicates that, contrary to claims by critics, urban corridors have considerably less congestion than suburban corridors, despite many times higher densities.
May 25, 2012   Streetsblog D.C.
Trying to thread the needle between those who celebrate the demise of the exurb and those who bemoan smart growth policies, Edward Glaeser argues that we can, and should, have it all when it comes to housing choice in America.
May 10, 2012   Bloomberg View
It is not, according to Wendell Cox, as posited in a recent article he's written for the website <em>New Geography</em>. Tim Evans looks at Cox's "creative use of Census geography" in his attempts to refute evidence of the growing urban comeback.
Apr 23, 2012   New Jersey Future
Angie Schmitt looks at the greenwash being applied to new sprawl developments in Ohio, Indiana, and Texas as developers market to consumer preferences for more walkable urban environments.
Apr 14, 2012   Streetsblog D.C.
Census data reveals that California is the most urbanized state, with the most dense urban areas. But in California, sprawl, density, crowding, and urbanism are not always what they seem. Fortunately, a new law may help planners make sense of it all.
Apr 3, 2012   California Planning & Development Report
A conference held in London last Tuesday, called "Planet Under Pressure," provided a forum to begin to answer the question, reports Roxanne Palmer.
Apr 2, 2012   International Business Times