Sprawl

Feature
February 25, 2010, 5am PST
While Madrid's urban core is highly dense, the city has sprawled out over the last two decades much further than its growing population requires, says Madrid resident and planning consultant Marco Adelfio.
Marco Adelfio
February 4, 2010, 8am PST
As a preventive measure to avoid future NIMBYism, an Air Force base in Arizona has effectively blocked the spread of residential development close to its borders.
The Arizona Republic
January 28, 2010, 7am PST
The housing market -- and especially the exurban housing market -- played a major role in bringing about the current economic recession, according to this piece from Christopher Leinberger. He says sprawl is unlikely to regain its lost value.
The New Republic
January 16, 2010, 7am PST
<em>Metropolis</em> presents a slideshow of photographs by artist Christoph Gielen, who photographs suburban developments from a helicopter.
Metropolis
January 7, 2010, 12pm PST
Regional planning in CA's sprawling Central Valley has turned to the huge challenge of increasing density. Fortunately, SB 375 will facilitate planners' efforts to double Fresno County density to 8 units per acre. Yet institutional obstacles remain.
The Fresno Bee
November 30, 2009, 7am PST
Like many American cities, Lansing, Michigan, has been afflicted with sprawl since the end of World War II. Locals have identified the culprit: separate-use zoning.
Lansing City Pulse
November 19, 2009, 5am PST
There's no looking back now in the shift away from suburbs to a more sustainable urban model, writes Andre Shashaty, president of the Partnership for Sustainable Communities.
Salon.com
September 20, 2009, 9am PDT
This report from <em>NPR</em> looks at Houston's growth pattern, and the evolution of a city that at once provides a high quality of life but also creates a big environmental impact.
NPR
Blog post
September 17, 2009, 9am PDT

Should society encourage parents to drive children to school rather than walk or bicycle? Should our transportation policies favor driving over walking, cycling, ridesharing, public transit and telecommuting? Probably not. There is no logical reason to favor automobile travel over other forms of accessibility, and there are lots of good reasons to favor efficient modes, so for example, schools spend at least as much to accommodate a walking or cycling trip as an automobile trip, and transportation agencies and employers spend at least as much to improve ridesharing and public transit commuting as automobile commuting.

Todd Litman
September 3, 2009, 2pm PDT
Policies that encourage density as a way to reduce carbon emissions won't be able to play a significant role in reducing carbon emissions in time to counteract global warming, according to a new report from the National Academy of Sciences.
Technology Review
September 3, 2009, 1pm PDT
Consumer preference surveys indicate that total U.S. demand for large-lot, exurban housing will not increase, while demand for small-lot and attached housing in accessible, multi-modal locations will double during the next two decades.
Victoria Transport Policy Institute
Blog post
September 2, 2009, 10pm PDT

Location, location, location. Choosing a smart home location can help households become healthy, wealthy and wise, since it affects residents’ physical activity levels, long-term financial burdens and opportunities for education and social interaction.

Todd Litman
August 20, 2009, 6am PDT
Beijing could be heading towards a sprawling future, according to a new report from the World Bank. Despite expanding transit options, the location of jobs is pushing more people out from the center of the city.
The New York Times Style Magazine
Blog post
July 20, 2009, 3pm PDT

Once upon a time, there was a city called City. And everyone living in City voted in the same elections and paid taxes to the same government.

And then 5 percent of the people decided that they wanted to live in an new neighborhood that was opened up for development by the highways. And they called it Richburb, because they were, if not rich, at least a little richer than many of the people in the city (since even if there wasn’t zoning to keep the poor out, new housing usually costs more than old housing anyhow).

Michael Lewyn
June 20, 2009, 1pm PDT
The Phoenix Region recently opened a 20-mile light rail serving three cities. StreetFilms brings you a video profile of the new system.
la.streetsblog.org
June 17, 2009, 12pm PDT
With great fanfare, the Bay Area's Greenbelt Alliance has released a new report, "Grow Smart Bay Area", the premise being that future population and job growth can be accommodated by infill and by doing so, will add to the region's sustainability.
San Jose Mercury News
May 22, 2009, 1pm PDT
A controversial bill on the desk of FL Gov. Crist is touted by supporters as 'smart growth' because they feel it will direct growth to urban areas, which are defined as 1,000 people per sq. mile. At stake is transportation mitigation of new projects.
The New York Times - U.S.
May 21, 2009, 7am PDT
Wendell Cox argues that the growth of the suburbs is not attributable to flight from cities, but to residents of small towns and the countryside moving to denser living.
New Geography
Blog post
May 8, 2009, 10am PDT

Mike Lydon
Blog post
April 6, 2009, 7am PDT

Transportation concurrency is the subject of a bill that has passed one house of the Florida legislature. "Concurrency" is the Florida term for "adequate public facilities controls," indicating that facilities need not necessarily be in place at the time of project approval but that they must be scheduled to become available "concurrently" with demand from proposed development.

Eric Damian Kelly