Local Culture

Feature
January 12, 2015, 5am PST
'Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class' by Scott Timberg argues that cities must defend and support local culture in the face of the homogenizing effects of the creative class.
Josh Stephens
March 10, 2014, 1pm PDT
The city of Anchorage, Alaska has a number of new developments in the pipeline—some of which are located adjacent to residential neighborhoods. Can new development respect the values of native culture?
Arctic Urbanophile
Blog post
June 28, 2012, 9am PDT

One of the ways we identify places is by foods for which those places are known. Baltimore – crab. Maine – lobster. Cincinnati – chili. San Francisco – sourdough bread. Vienna – pastry. Even for a city to which you’ve never been, chances are that in your mind that city has some food association.

Lisa Feldstein
December 14, 2010, 10am PST
Single-story, tiled-roof houses called hanok used to cover the footprint of Seoul, now a city of skyscrapers and avant-garde architecture. Today many describe the hanok as "endangered,"and conflict has come to a head in the small district of Bukchon.
The New York Times
December 14, 2010, 6am PST
An influx of chain stores and new development in Harlem has many residents worried about retaining the historical character of the nation's so-called "African American 'Main-Street.'" Not everybody minds the changes though.
The Columbia Daily Spectator
December 13, 2010, 2pm PST
An under-20 population of more than 13 million and an eagerness to move the national economy away from oil production have the Saudi government investing heavily in huge new cities that are designed to encourage a 'Western-style modernity.'
The New York Times
October 21, 2009, 11am PDT
Global corporations like Frito Lay and Barnes and Noble are attempting to co-opt the word 'local' into their branding.
Utne Reader
July 15, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>Planners in Seattle want to add housing to Little Saigon, a neighborhood with a strong Vietnamese culture, without disrupting the district's character or displacing residents.</p>
The Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Blog post
April 17, 2008, 6am PDT

Cities are sized-up, measured and analyzed in countless ways. The Economist uses statistics to indicate how New York’s financial sector is faring against its London counterpart. Richard Florida measures the extant of the creative class. Allan Jacobs carefully records intersection densities and Jan Gehl simply counts pedestrians. Some, like Peter Calthorpe, go beyond the city line and take stock of the whole region.

Mike Lydon