Suburbia

The general principle is simple: more density equals lower prices and less environmental impact. But suburbia's imprint is deep, both on cities themselves and on how we expect to inhabit them.
Jul 27, 2015   Grist
For a long time, surface parking lots blanketed Maryland's Montgomery County. Developers and county officials now prioritize mixed-use infill with parking concealed underground.
Jul 7, 2015   WAMU
Chinese and Indian cities have been quick to welcome housing developments modeled on North American suburbs, including "Orange County" and "Vancouver Forest" in Beijing. This globalized sprawl perpetuates all the ills of our own.
Jun 30, 2015   The City Fix
According to this article, the market forces behind large home construction are alive and well. In a process of suburban gentrification, developers purchase older, smaller homes and build "McMansions" in their place.
Jun 8, 2015   Bloomberg
Successful driverless cars might lead to "mini mass transit," a distinct mode from public transit and the private automobile. The consequences for land use could reshape suburbia.
Mar 8, 2015   The Greater Marin
Ian Law of Place Alliance spoke to the 2014 ASLA Annual Meeting in Denver at the end of November about what it takes to accomplish a vision for a more dense, walkable suburban downtown.
Dec 15, 2014   ASLA The Dirt
Blog Post
In debates over sprawl, sometimes I hear something like the following conversation: SMART GROWTH SUPPORTER: Sprawl means ever-lengthening commutes from suburbia, which is bad because no one likes long commutes. Blog Post
May 9, 2014   By Michael Lewyn
“Can Paradise be Planned?” asks Allison Arieff in a recent op-ed. The article discusses new books by architect Robert A.M. Stern and photographer Christoph Gielen to look for reasons for optimism with regard to suburbs and planning.
Apr 21, 2014   New York Times
Recently, I was meditating about the relationship between affordable housing and sprawl.  It could be argued that auto-oriented sprawl, by opening up cheap suburban land for development, increases the housing supply and thus reduces housing costs.  Under current conditions, this theory seems to c Blog Post
Dec 31, 2013   By Michael Lewyn
Despite their fears, the well-off residents of Mount Laurel have been unaffected by the “fair share” of affordable housing mandated by the U.S. Supreme Court in the landmark battle over the socioeconomic integration of suburbia.
Oct 22, 2013   The New York Times
As housing (un)affordability continues to plague Canada’s big cities, some would-be city dwellers are looking to the suburbs to meet the budget. Using a hypothetical Toronto couple as its basis, number-crunching suggests little long-term savings.
Oct 11, 2013   The Globe and Mail (Toronto)