Transit Planning

A transit rider and writer has a simple and succinct request for transit planners in Minneapolis: straighten out your transit routes.
Feb 1, 2016   Streets.MN
Nashville residents are being asked to choose their preference among a menu of transit planning options. The most expensive version of the plan would cost $5.4 billion, the least $800 million.
Jan 29, 2016   The Tennessean
To alleviate tourist traffic and serve residents, the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada has unveiled a long-term plan to invest billions in transit improvements including light rail and an expanded monorail.
Jan 2, 2016   Las Vegas Sun
Following an "overnight" system redesign, Houston Metro ridership and frequency is up across the board. Its high frequency bus service now rivals that of peer cities on weekends.
Jan 2, 2016   LinkedIn
Based out of San Francisco, Remix is an intuitive, data-rich tool for transit planners as they consider new routes. All you need to do is draw out the line on a map and add stops.
Dec 24, 2015   Next City
A proposed BRT route between Palo Alto and San Jose is the latest to hit a setback.
Dec 1, 2015   Palo Alto Online
With a light rail network now reaching 60 miles, the Portland region is ready to explore its next regional transit options.
Nov 30, 2015   The Oregonian
The latest plan for the Texas Central high-speed rail line would stop trains well short of downtown Houston. Transit advocates are displeased with the change of plans.
Nov 28, 2015   Houston Chronicle
One of the busiest corridors in Northern Virginia, both in traffic and development, is under consideration for a new transit line.
Nov 18, 2015   WAMU
New leadership at Los Angeles County's Metro says its planning efforts should consider much more than transit routes and service—including the potential for gentrification in the neighborhoods where it's investing.
Oct 14, 2015   Los Angeles Times
When San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener proclaimed last month that his city "should always have a subway under construction," there were many doubters due to the funds required and unlikelihood of federal support. "Aggressive" is good, says Foxx.
Oct 8, 2015   San Francisco Examiner